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Climate Change: Fact and Denial


450 million years ago where I sit in Minnesota was located near the equator. This cephalopod found on this property probably died in what's called The 2nd mass extinction, I think maybe caused by colder climate change brought on by an asteroid impact that started a series of volcanic activities that cooled the planet.
abf4d945ba309e0b46c8ac33129c1995.jpg



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Geothermal activity has been doing this for millions of years. The planet is very chaotic. I find it odd liberals feel they should have a thermostat for the planet and that glaciers and ice should never change. There used to be about a mile thick chunk of ice where I sit not that long ago.
There is no 'should' because there is no design.

There is only 'is.' Nature has exactly one mechanism for evolution: allowing random chance with biology.

We should have a thermostat for the planet to keep it viable for humanity.

Nature won't care whether we live or die, and neither will the planet.
 
450 million years ago where I sit in Minnesota was located near the equator. This cephalopod found on this property probably died in what's called The 2nd mass extinction, I think maybe caused by colder climate change brought on by an asteroid impact that started a series of volcanic activities that cooled the planet.
abf4d945ba309e0b46c8ac33129c1995.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Are we back to that? Have you looked at what your home town looked like geologically at that time?

Hint: it was at the bottom of an inland ocean.

Want to go back there?
 
Are we back to that? Have you looked at what your home town looked like geologically at that time?

Hint: it was at the bottom of an inland ocean.

Want to go back there?

Thank you for making my point.
The planet is chaotic. It gets hot, cold, land masses move half way around the world, there have been at the very least 6 mass extinctions, 100's of asteroid impacts, CO2 levels over 5000 ppm etc etc etc all without the influence of humans and their barely measurable addition of CO2 which is responsible for all life on earth.
Think about it. CO2 has rarely been this low, we are in an interglacial period and sea levels are rising at barely 3 mm a year.
And you are wetting your pants. Get a grip college boy. Lmao.
 
Thank you for making my point.
The planet is chaotic. It gets hot, cold, land masses move half way around the world, there have been at the very least 6 mass extinctions, 100's of asteroid impacts, CO2 levels over 5000 ppm etc etc etc all without the influence of humans and their barely measurable addition of CO2 which is responsible for all life on earth.
Think about it. CO2 has rarely been this low, we are in an interglacial period and sea levels are rising at barely 3 mm a year.
And you are wetting your pants. Get a grip college boy. Lmao.
Ok so you're good with a mass extinction of humanity. The good news for you is humanity is on track for that. The bad news is most people don't want humanity to go extinct.

There's a community for you:
Voluntary Human Extinction Movement - Wikipedia
 
Ok so you're good with a mass extinction of humanity. The good news for you is humanity is on track for that. The bad news is most people don't want humanity to go extinct.

There's a community for you:
Voluntary Human Extinction Movement - Wikipedia

I never said that. It would be unfortunate to go extinct. But 400 or even 2000 ppm CO2 isn't going to cause it.
My guess Yellowstone park or another asteroid impact will cause the next extinction. You liberals are not so special that you get a pass on a normal extinction event.
Why not feed the poor instead of dumping trillions into something you can't do anything about?
Think about it, you are supposed to be smart. This ain't rocket science and what you subscribe to isn't even climate science.
 
450 million years ago where I sit in Minnesota was located near the equator. This cephalopod found on this property probably died in what's called The 2nd mass extinction, I think maybe caused by colder climate change brought on by an asteroid impact that started a series of volcanic activities that cooled the planet.
abf4d945ba309e0b46c8ac33129c1995.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

That is really cool!

Do you know what type of Cephalopod?

Roughly how big is the fossil?

I am well aware that the planet's climate has fluctuated violently over the billions of years it has been around.
I think that is part of the reason I am concerned about it in the first place.
Mass extinctions maybe part of the cycle or 'scheme' of things but that wont lessen the blow.

When I was a child I used to keep tropical fishes, and this taught me a few lessons about 'eco systems' and animal 'communities'.
When you have a fish tank you are responsible for populating it (as in choosing the kind of fish you want to keep in the tank).
You are responsible for what type of plants are in there.
You choose the gravel.
You buy a Heater, Filter and Pump and try your best to match the PH etc of the water the fish you own come from.

All of this is on the face of it relatively simple, but if one small part is wrong it can result in the injury or death of your fishes.
Fishes that the pet shop will be only to happy to replenish. (for a fee of course). They have a vested interest a bit like opticians do with eye tests.

To cut a long story short recreating ideal conditions for life is not child's play. If the balance is upset for whatever reason, be it man made or otherwise, the consequence are demonstrably cataclysmic. like you said it has happened before loads of times.
If there is even the remotest possibility that we are hastening our own demise (or maybe more realistically the demise of future generations) We should do everything we can to try and stop while we still can, but to be honest I think we passed that tipping point a while ago.

I am not convinced that 'man' made that Iceberg start to form, but I am not entirely sure he didn't either.

It does seem a bit convenient that the worlds biggest polluter is also the home of 'climate change denial' but I am probably just a bit of a cynic.

Honestly I don't know or understand all the facts when it comes to climate change etc, so I am basing what I think on what I experienced with my aquarium. Obviously the Planet is another kettle of Fish! ;) one which I am not informed enough about to debate.
 
I never said that. It would be unfortunate to go extinct. But 400 or even 2000 ppm CO2 isn't going to cause it.
My guess Yellowstone park or another asteroid impact will cause the next extinction. You liberals are not so special that you get a pass on a normal extinction event.
Why not feed the poor instead of dumping trillions into something you can't do anything about?
Think about it, you are supposed to be smart. This ain't rocket science and what you subscribe to isn't even climate science.
Bwahahaha!

Keep dreaming, Pixel.
 
That is really cool!

Do you know what type of Cephalopod?

Roughly how big is the fossil?

I am well aware that the planet's climate has fluctuated violently over the billions of years it has been around.
I think that is part of the reason I am concerned about it in the first place.
Mass extinctions maybe part of the cycle or 'scheme' of things but that wont lessen the blow.

When I was a child I used to keep tropical fishes, and this taught me a few lessons about 'eco systems' and animal 'communities'.
When you have a fish tank you are responsible for populating it (as in choosing the kind of fish you want to keep in the tank).
You are responsible for what type of plants are in there.
You choose the gravel.
You buy a Heater, Filter and Pump and try your best to match the PH etc of the water the fish you own come from.

All of this is on the face of it relatively simple, but if one small part is wrong it can result in the injury or death of your fishes.
Fishes that the pet shop will be only to happy to replenish. (for a fee of course). They have a vested interest a bit like opticians do with eye tests.

To cut a long story short recreating ideal conditions for life is not child's play. If the balance is upset for whatever reason, be it man made or otherwise, the consequence are demonstrably cataclysmic. like you said it has happened before loads of times.
If there is even the remotest possibility that we are hastening our own demise (or maybe more realistically the demise of future generations) We should do everything we can to try and stop while we still can, but to be honest I think we passed that tipping point a while ago.

I am not convinced that 'man' made that Iceberg start to form, but I am not entirely sure he didn't either.

It does seem a bit convenient that the worlds biggest polluter is also the home of 'climate change denial' but I am probably just a bit of a cynic.

Honestly I don't know or understand all the facts when it comes to climate change etc, so I am basing what I think on what I experienced with my aquarium. Obviously the Planet is another kettle of Fish! ;) one which I am not informed enough about to debate.

Not sure what type of cephalopod it is. The fragment is about 2 feet. I have donated a 6 foot specimen to a museum.
I don't believe we have come close to any tipping point in fact I believe human CO2 may have even saved the planet from a possible extinction event. We are still dangerously low on CO2.
 
Bwahahaha!

Keep dreaming, Pixel.

Nice reply. Not a single scientific thought of your own or response to valid points about earths history. Another typical blathering liberal is all you are.
Please don't waste anymore of my time.
 
Nice reply. Not a single scientific thought of your own or response to valid points about earths history. Another typical blathering liberal is all you are.
Please don't waste anymore of my time.
Why do you keep calling me liberal?

I voted PC (our right wing party) last time. Mostly because Trudeau kept taking his shirt off and he has better abs than me.
 
Why do you keep calling me liberal?

I voted PC (our right wing party) last time. Mostly because Trudeau kept taking his shirt off and he has better abs than me.

My apologies. Then why are you so ignorant about science?
 
Not sure what type of cephalopod it is. The fragment is about 2 feet. I have donated a 6 foot specimen to a museum.
I don't believe we have come close to any tipping point in fact I believe human CO2 may have even saved the planet from a possible extinction event. We are still dangerously low on CO2.

Wow! I had no idea that shelled cepholopods could grow to that size!
I did a brief google search and found this:

cameroceras-size.jpg
*

it was very generous of you to donate that specimen.
It has also made me think about what it was swimming about with.

*I am not sure that his is the same 'species' as your fossils but I think it would have looked roughly similar.

Thank you for sharing your find.
 
Wow! I had no idea that shelled cepholopods could grow to that size!
I did a brief google search and found this:

cameroceras-size.jpg
*

it was very generous of you to donate that specimen.
It has also made me think about what it was swimming about with.

*I am not sure that his is the same 'species' as your fossils but I think it would have looked roughly similar.

Thank you for sharing your find.

Hey all kidding aside... seriously Pixel, cool find and good on ya for donating it.
 
Wow! I had no idea that shelled cepholopods could grow to that size!
I did a brief google search and found this:

cameroceras-size.jpg
*

it was very generous of you to donate that specimen.
It has also made me think about what it was swimming about with.

*I am not sure that his is the same 'species' as your fossils but I think it would have looked roughly similar.

Thank you for sharing your find.

Yup that's what it looked like. Cephalopods have survived several mass extinctions. I think humans could too.
 
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