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Welcome Dr. Emily Zarka - Monsters in History

USI Calgary

J. Randall Murphy
Staff member
1593501686252.png Emily Zarka ( a.k.a. Dr. Z ) earned a Doctor of Philosophy in English from Arizona State University, with an emphasis on the Gothic and the British Romantic period. She approaches literature and film through monsters, applying the theory that human history is monster history.

She writes for and hosts for Monstrum, an online series with PBS's Storied channel on YouTube that looks at complex histories and motivations behind some of the world's most famous monsters.

Emily's teaching experience includes literature, composition, film and media, and humanities classes. Currently, she is part of the faculties of both Arizona State University and Mesa Community College.

Website: HOME | emilyelizabethzarka
The show will be recorded Thursday July 2, 2020, between 4 and 6 PM MDT.
Post your questions and comments for discussion below
 
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marduk

quelling chaos since 2352BC
I'm currently reading "Where the Footprints End" and I'm curious what her take is on modern monster hunters discounting or ignoring some of the high strangeness in many monster encounters. I fully realize this is an attempt to gain traction with academia, but I'm curious how she sees this fitting in with the larger historical narrative around monsters.
 

USI Calgary

J. Randall Murphy
Staff member
I'm currently reading "Where the Footprints End" and I'm curious what her take is on modern monster hunters discounting or ignoring some of the high strangeness in many monster encounters. I fully realize this is an attempt to gain traction with academia, but I'm curious how she sees this fitting in with the larger historical narrative around monsters.
Your question was asked. We touched on some related issues too.
 


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