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Any Evidence of Authentic Predictions?

stonehart

Paranormal Adept
Titanic didn't capsize because Leonardo Dicaprio and Kate Winslet wouldn't have that really dramatic moment on the rear deck when it went under.....duh!:rolleyes:


tumblr_ma7m4vesnz1rdiecno1_400.jpg



hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!! nice reply man well played indeed
 

Polterwurst

Paranormal Adept
Just found out about this guy Jim Karol

Previously called “The Wild and Wacky Jim Karol,” he earned the moniker “Psychic Madman” at age 37 when the Pennsylvania Lottery numbers that were drawn matched his prediction.[1] As a result, the numerous people who had taken Karol's advice ended up dividing a $12 million payout into small shares.

Was that a lucky guess or what? He's called a memory expert and mentalist, which probably means he doesn't claim to be psychic. But of course predicting lottery numbers correctly would be what sceptics demand of so-called psychics (and what psychics themselves often say is impossible, "it can't be controlled, you can't use it to your advantage, numbers are most difficult to 'see'"). Does anybody have any info on him?
 
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Oakenwulf

Paranormal Maven
wonder if psychic ability/gifts have laws or limitations that are to be followed.. numbers are hard.... heard test taking ( school or career exams) are difficult to read too
 

Constance

Paranormal Adept
. . . One thing to think about Angelo, is that the design of the human brain/mind system produces an isolation of human awareness from any direct experience of ourselves and the real world we find ourselves in. Therefore all of our observations are actually being made of a simulation (our consciousness) of something else (the real world.) Our perception of the real world isn't just filtered or skewed, it is a complete production. There are things occurring in the real world and in real world human interaction, that we are casually unaware of due to our design specifications, so to speak.

The idea you're expressing is a very popular one in our time, but it is not proved and is radically overstated. When we attend to our actual experience in life we realize that we have direct contact with our actual environment, social and cultural structures, and other people and animals among whom and which we shape our autobiographical lives (and indeed, as a species, shape the local world we are living in). Yes, "there are probably things occurring in the real world and human interactions that we are unaware of." We see and hear only a portion of what exists in the em spectrum. We don't understand ourselves or others fully. And we don't yet comprehend the nature of reality. But we live in a real world discernible to the extent to which many phenomena we encounter, reflect on, and investigate scientifically and philosophically can be and are understood. If we did not live in a world we share in common with other conscious minds we could not function collectively as we do and our disciplines of knowledge would have gotten nowhere in the last 12,000+ years.
 

Constance

Paranormal Adept
The closest thing I know to an actual "kind" of prediction that came true ( not political or economic) was a book written years before the sinking of the Titanic that described almost exactly the events that happened. The book was "Futility; or The Wreck of the Titan".
Much as I dislike using Wikipedia as a reference, here's the link: Futility, or the Wreck of the Titan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia .
The similarities are so alike it's eerie.

----------------------------------------------------------
Although the novel was written before the Olympic-class Titanic had even been designed, there are some remarkable similarities between the fictional and real-life counterparts. Like the Titanic, the fictional ship sank in April in the North Atlantic, and there were not enough lifeboats for the passengers. There are also similarities between the size (800 ft long for Titan versus 882 ft 9 in long for the Titanic[2]), speed (25 knots for Titan, 22.5 knots for Titanic[3]) and life-saving equipment.
Beyond the name, the similarities between the Titanic and the fictional Titan include:[4]
  • Both were triple screw (propeller)
  • Described as "unsinkable"
    • The Titanic was the world's largest luxury liner (882 feet, displacing 63,000 long tons), and was once described by newspapers as being "practically unsinkable".[5]
    • The Titan was the largest craft afloat and the greatest of the works of men (800 feet, displacing 75,000 tons, up from 45,000 in the 1898 edition), and was considered "unsinkable".
  • Shortage of lifeboats
    • The Titanic carried only 16 lifeboats, plus 4 Engelhardt folding lifeboats,[6] less than half the number required for her passenger and crew capacity of 3000.
    • The Titan carried "as few as the law allowed", 24 lifeboats, less than half needed for her 3000 capacity.
  • Struck an iceberg
    • Moving at 22½ knots,[7] the Titanic struck an iceberg on the starboard side on the night of April 14, 1912 in the North Atlantic 400 miles away from Newfoundland.
    • Also on an April night, in the North Atlantic 400 miles from Newfoundland (Terranova), the Titan hit an iceberg while traveling at 25 knots, also on the starboard side.
  • Sinking
    • The unsinkable Titanic sank, and more than half of her 2200 passengers and crew died.
    • The indestructible Titan also sank, more than half of her 2500 passengers drowning.
    • Went down bow first, the Titan actually capsizing before it sank.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I don't know what to think of this book.

I think it's a case of impressive precognition.
 

Constance

Paranormal Adept
I was listening to a lecture by Dean Radin during lunch break. There was a recording he played, a part of an interview by Sir Alec Guinness about his prediction of James Dean's death.

I had totally forgotten about that anecdote and actually I had always thought that wasn't a claim the great british actor had made himself but a claim that had been made about him.

In the interview, Guinness said that while James Dean was showing him his new car, something "almost like a different voice" came over him and told him to warn the younger american actor that if he kept the car, he would be dead by the same time a week later. Guiness said that he gave that warning, and Dean didn't listen. A week later James Dean had his fatal accident in said new car.

I just googled to see if I could find the actual interview, but didn't find anything. I'll just post the link to the Radin lecture:

"Survival of Consciousness" with Dean Radin and Julie Beischel (part 1 of 3) | IONS Library | Institute of Noetic Sciences

The interview can be found at about 57:00 min.

It seems that Guinness never made any other claims about "psi"-related stuff, but my feeling is that if this had been a one-off experience, he wouldn't have said anything. If I imagine something like that happening to me for the first time, I'd say nothing, out of fear to sound like I've gone crazy. Only if that had happened before and the warning had turned out to be correct, would I consider that.

But maybe he was the kind of person who would say something like that just on the spur of the moment. Or he did have other premonitions, but those weren't that remarkable and didn't involve other famous people, so he kept that private. You never know with these creative actor types. If I remember right, Anthony Hopkins claims he has had similar things happen.

It could have been an isolated case of precognition but so vivid that Guinness felt an obligation to warn Dean. I've read about many similar cases of precognized crisis information occurring in individuals without recognized psychic abilities that also proved out to be veridical.
 
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Constance

Paranormal Adept
@Polterwurst, the Titan/Titanic precognition reminds me of an excellent book by John Fuller entitled The Airmen Who Would Not Die concerning two precognitions of and the later reconstruction through mediums of another disaster -- the crash of the UK’s first mega-dirigible in the 1930s. The book's character is captured in the Amazon description and in two of the reviews at amazon, copied below. I read this book in 2009 and found it fascinating.



Description from Amazon:

Stranger and even more compelling than his best-selling The Ghost of Flight 401, journalist John G. Fuller turns his talents to the historic crash of the great British dirigible R101, the luxury lighter-than-air behemoth that was to revolutionize travel in the 1930s.

The complex and absolutely spell-binding tale begins in 1928 when a monoplane carrying famed World War I ace Captain Raymond Hinchliffe and his copilot, the flamboyant heiress-actress Elsie Mackay, vanishes without a trace over the stormy Atlantic. As news of the disappearance makes front-page headlines around the world, British workers race to complete the largest and most advanced airship yet designed, the monumental R101. Neither medium Eileeen Garrett's terrifying pre-vision of a dirigible tragedy, nor an even more fearful warning from the dead captain Hinchliffe to another mystic, Mrs. Earl, are held as grounds for delaying the much-publicized launch of the R101 for India. Finally, in a seance that includes both women and the world-famous author Conan Doyle, Hinchliffe warns the navigator of the R101 of its various structural problems.

Despite these warnings, the 777-foot R101 takes off on schedule - and plunges to the ground on the French side of the Channel, killing all but six of the fifty-four aboard. But the disaster does not mark the end of this mind-boggling tale. Two days later, through another seance, the commander of the ill-fated airship recounts in horrible detail the anguished end of the R101 and its crew. Bristling with suspense and astonishing evidence concerning the validity of psychic phenomena, The Airmen Who Would Not Die is a riveting account of a human tragedy and the superhuman events surrounding it.

Reviews


"John G. Fuller does remarkable research and investigative work in examining two cases of air disasters that are linked through paranormal contacts with the deceased. Like his book, The Ghost of Flight 401 (which I also recommend), Fuller brings to life the story of ace flyer Raymond Hinchcliffe, who hoped to be the first to fly across the Atlantic, from Europe to America (Lindberg had already done it the other way). To add spice to the story, a rich young heiress funded his flight and insisted on going with him, figuring to grab some glory for herself as the first woman to cross the Atlantic in an airplane. But it was not to be.

At the same time period (the late 1920s), Great Britain was working on a program for air travel to facilitate getting around the empire, which was worldwide. But they were not thinking of sending passengers on long-distance trips in the cramped cockpit of a biplane. They were betting on another form of air travel that the Germans were successfully using - the lighter-than-air machine; in this case, a dirigible labeled the R-101. It was a huge cylindrical machine filled with giant bags of hydrogen, and a sizable team of workers were tasked with getting it ready for a virgin flight to India. Lord Thompson had set a date for its flight based on a conference he had to attend, but the engineers, architects and pilots who knew it intimately believed the R101 was not ready for such an undertaking. Like Hinchcliffe's ill-fated flight, the R101 made headlines worldwide when it crashed in a field in France during a rain storm. All but six aboard were killed.
And it's the story of what happened after these tragtic deaths that makes Fuller's book so fascinating. First messages were received from Hinchcliffe through a oija board and later through the brilliant medium, Eileen Garrett. Hinchcliffe was concerned for his wife and small children, but also sent messages about what had happened to his flight, along with ominous predictions about the R101 flight to India ending in disaster due to poor design. Later, the deceased crew of the dirigible sent messages through mediums, and two men, each unaware of the work of the other, received communications through medium Eileen Garrett. Later, the communication received by each was available to investigators, who, in every case, concluded that communication with the deceased was the only viable answer to how these messages could have come about.

The information received through the medium was often highly technical, dealing with terms, equipment and techniques that only someone who was involved with the dirigible project could have known. The book includes many verbatim exchanges. Of course, these were the result of someone taking shorthand transcription or writing very fast notes. All of these events ocurred before personal tape recorders were available, and the author discusses the methods and their limitations at length. Besides being an interesting account of an important subject (do we survive death?), the book is also a fascinating look at another era. Anyone with an interest in aviation will enjoy reading the stories of both the Hinchcliffe flight and the making of the R101. It indicated to me that big government projects had the same problems then as they do now - the R101 project was full of political considerations trumping common sense, people afraid to stand up to powerful politicians and finally - after the expensive airship was reduced to a pile of rubble in a field in France - an investigation and apparent cover-up!

If I have a criticism of the book, it is the swing between whether the story is mainly about the tragic events involving aviation in the late 1920s, using material from the mediums to fill in what is known from history, or whether the book is mainly about proving that we, in spirit form, continue to exist after death. I think Fuller certainly got caught up in the story of the airmen, but he also wanted to continue a subject he tackled in The Ghost of Flight 401, which also produced excellent evidence for survival. This is an old book (the copyright is 1979) and Fuller himself has now passed on. But his excellent books are still available if you look for them, and they are still very worthwhile reading." --Theresa Walsh


"The early years of aviation were full of achievement, glory, and death in the air or when the ground was met unintentionally. Three separate stories of men who died and then returned to tell their stories are intertwined to produce some of the most compelling evidence of survival after death.

First there's Alfred Lowenstein, a Belgian pilot and financier, who leaps to his death from his private plane over the English Channel. Then, Captain Raymond Hinchliffe, WW1 ace and one-eyed master pilot, who disappears over the Atlantic while trying to be the first to cross the ocean east to west (carrying Elsie Mackay, heiress and celebrity, as passenger). And finally, the crew of R-101, Britain's largest rigid airship and apple of Air Minister Thomson's eye. The airship crashed en route to India, killing nearly everyone on board.

But even if the official inquiry was a whitewash, the intelligent and profuse medium Eileen Garrett channeled the story of the crash as seen by the men who perished in the crash and the ensuing fire. The person who sat at the seances taking notes was one major Villiers, who never revealed his identity to the medium, but was one of the key players in the development of the R-101 at the Air Ministry. The sheer amount of technical data provided by he medium, who could not possibly have known the nautical terms applied to the dirigible by the men who built the ship and flew it, is astounding.

So is the attitude of the crew. At first reticent, but later on very vocal in their need to tell what really happened to R-101, the crew come across Eileen Garrett's voice and tell the harrowing tale of sacrificing the best brains of the airship design and flight teams to the altar of Lord Thomson's ego. Hinchliffe appears from beyond time and space to try and warn the crew not to take off as the ship will not be airworthy
.
John G. Fuller's writing style s somewhat technical and at times tedious, but his research is immaculate. To his great benefit, the documents pertaining to the R-101 and the other events described are stored at the Air Ministry, British Museum Archives, and the venerable British Society for Psychical Research (among other places), and they are fully referenced. Of particular interest are the transcripts from the original sessions of Major Villiers with Eileen Garrett. These, if nothing else, will convince you this is no hoax.

Many times people say, there can't be any truth to parapsychology for the lack of evidence. But absence of evidence is no evidence of absence , as it is often said, and the story as told in this book is very strong for the case of human survival.
I cannot recommend this book strongly enough to anybody interested in the subject matter.
-Heikki Hietala, author of Tulagi Hotel


There is a further paranormal event included in this book which I had already read about elsewhere: at the time of Hinchliffe's plane's crash in the Atlantic, a close friend of his (traveling in a shared cabin in a ship at sea) received a crisis apparition of him in which Hinchliffe tells him what has just happened. Corroborating his report, the man with whom he'd been sharing the cabin also saw Hinchliffe and signed his testimony to that effect for the SPR.
 

Bob Watson

Paranormal Adept
I have been a titanic buff for years. I have read "futility" the ship described in the book differs from the Titanic. .the titan has sails and a steam engine. The ship has been in service for a time. The month of the year is not mentioned. Few survive the wreck. They survive by getting to the iceberg an await rescue. So I would rate it about 40% correct.
 

Bob Watson

Paranormal Adept
Other facts are titanic was never advertised as being unsinkable. Titan was. Much has been made of the lack of lifeboats. Every ship of the era was the same way! Also the size tonage and capacity was constant with ships of the day. Also after the sinking the book was reissued.an number of changes were made to the book. Lastly compare the description of the ship to any ship of the day (Olympic Mauritania ect)
 

Polterwurst

Paranormal Adept
I've never found the idea convincing that the book was predicting what happened to the Titanic. It's really weak as evidence for precognition.

If anything, it was a warning what might happen if we get over-confident of our technological achievements. The only oddity IMO is the similarity of the ship's names, but that could be pure coincidence. To name a ship of never before seen proportions, giant mythological creatures are an obvious choice. I could only think of "Leviathan" as an alternative.

What interests me more about the Titanic or rather, any ship, train or airplane catastrophe, is if proof exists that passengers cancelled their passages because of dreams or visions they had about a disaster.

Ever so often you hear that these ships / planes / trains have an unusually high number of cancellations and I guess there were some insurance statistics about that.

What bothers me a little is why people get stuck with a weak case like that and don't look at the many other tcases that could be evidence, some of which are much more interesting IMO.

What was that "different voice" Sir Alec Guiness talked and wrote about? Self-mystification? Or how could Jim Karol get the lottery numbers right? Coincidence or just a gut feeling? Or is it all just exaggeration and distortion of facts?

EDIT

...or what about Bishop Lanyi's dream of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, apparently recorded by himself the night before it really happened (differing in some minor details)?

...what about Adam Linzmayer, one of J.B. Rhine's test subjects who would "predict" Zener cards with impossible accuracy (but only for one year)? Just a conjuror who managed to trick the scientists? Btw., be sure to read the commentary to the linked article, I think it 's really his daughter.
 
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Burnt State

Paranormal Adept
I think it's a case of impressive precognition.
Really?... And not one of those simple cases where truth is just stranger than fiction. There are so many novels that in their own way "predicted" the future, but like that texts listed in the article below, it seems to me that imaginative authors will always give us some insight into future happenings. Whether it's speculative fiction or simply creating plot lines out of what we know or think is likely to happen next I'm not sure that coincidence or similarities should be given too much merit beyond being what they are which is just fiction.

Books That Predicted The Future - Books - ShortList Magazine
 

Constance

Paranormal Adept
I've never found the idea convincing that the book was predicting what happened to the Titanic. It's really weak as evidence for precognition.

If anything, it was a warning what might happen if we get over-confident of our technological achievements. The only oddity IMO is the similarity of the ship's names, but that could be pure coincidence. To name a ship of never before seen proportions, giant mythological creatures are an obvious choice. I could only think of "Leviathan" as an alternative.

What interests me more about the Titanic or rather, any ship, train or airplane catastrophe, is if proof exists that passengers cancelled their passages because of dreams or visions they had about a disaster.

Ever so often you hear that these ships / planes / trains have an unusually high number of cancellations and I guess there were some insurance statistics about that.

What bothers me a little is why people get stuck with a weak case like that and don't look at the many other tcases that could be evidence, some of which are much more interesting IMO.

What was that "different voice" Sir Alec Guiness talked and wrote about? Self-mystification? Or how could Jim Karol get the lottery numbers right? Coincidence or just a gut feeling? Or is it all just exaggeration and distortion of facts?

EDIT

...or what about Bishop Lanyi's dream of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, apparently recorded by himself the night before it really happened (differing in some minor details)?

...what about Adam Linzmayer, one of J.B. Rhine's test subjects who would "predict" Zener cards with impossible accuracy (but only for one year)? Just a conjuror who managed to trick the scientists? Btw., be sure to read the commentary to the linked article, I think it 's really his daughter.

The Global Consciousness Project is relevant to our questions:

Global Consciousness Project
 

Constance

Paranormal Adept
Really?... And not one of those simple cases where truth is just stranger than fiction. There are so many novels that in their own way "predicted" the future, but like that texts listed in the article below, it seems to me that imaginative authors will always give us some insight into future happenings. Whether it's speculative fiction or simply creating plot lines out of what we know or think is likely to happen next I'm not sure that coincidence or similarities should be given too much merit beyond being what they are which is just fiction.

Books That Predicted The Future - Books - ShortList Magazine

The RNG-based experiments at PEAR and Bem's recent experiments, like the Global Consciousness Project's 911 data, are harder to explain. So is the crisis apparitions data gathered twice by the SPR, and the mediumship data involving precognition recorded by the SPR over many decades. Combined with two millennia of recorded precognitive visions, it's all a lot to overcome.
 

Burnt State

Paranormal Adept
The RNG-based experiments at PEAR and Bem's recent experiments, like the Global Consciousness Project's 911 data, are harder to explain. So is the crisis apparitions data gathered twice by the SPR, and the mediumship data involving precognition recorded by the SPR over many decades. Combined with two millennia of recorded precognitive visions, it's all a lot to overcome.
I'm not sure what you mean by "it's all a lot to overcome," but as much as I like listening to Dean Radin on Radio Misterioso when you look at critical evaluations of PEAR's millions of data points there does not seem to be a lot of support for any positive findings at all. No double blind studies were conducted, the data that they chose to show deviations from the norm to produce a positive result for micro-precognition appears to be more selective than consistent with the 9/11 material specifically being called into question.

From WikiP. "Independent scientists Edwin May and James Spottiswoode conducted an analysis of the data around the 11 September 2001 events and concluded there was no statistically significant change in the randomness of the GCP data during the attacks and the apparent significant deviation reported by Nelson and Radin existed only in their chosen time window.[20] Spikes and fluctuations are to be expected in any random distribution of data, and there is no set time frame for how close a spike has to be to a given event for the GCP to say they have found a correlation.[20] Wolcotte Smith said "A couple of additional statistical adjustments would have to be made to determine if there really was a spike in the numbers," referencing the data related to September 11, 2001.[21] Similarly, Jeffrey D. Scargle believes unless both Bayesian and classical p-value analysis agree and both show the same anomalous effects, the kind of result GCP proposes will not be generally accepted.[22]"

But aside from all the doubt from the skeptical and university folk who reflect on this work I'd be curious to know what you think of the critique of looking for pre-cognition, or reverse causality, or even remote viewing when it comes from more of a paranormal insider like Hansen: Princeton [PEAR] Remote-Viewing Experiments -- A Critique
 

Constance

Paranormal Adept
I'm not sure what you mean by "it's all a lot to overcome," but as much as I like listening to Dean Radin on Radio Misterioso when you look at critical evaluations of PEAR's millions of data points there does not seem to be a lot of support for any positive findings at all. No double blind studies were conducted, the data that they chose to show deviations from the norm to produce a positive result for micro-precognition appears to be more selective than consistent with the 9/11 material specifically being called into question.

Can double-blind studies be conducted in immense statistical experiments such as Jahn's at PEAR taking place over many years with a succession of participants? Jessica Utts has written at length in response to critics of the statistical procedures she used in reporting on the PEAR experiments.. That controversy is complex. In general I found Utts persuasive in her responses, analyses, descriptions of methodology, and explanations.


From WikiP. "Independent scientists Edwin May and James Spottiswoode conducted an analysis of the data around the 11 September 2001 events and concluded there was no statistically significant change in the randomness of the GCP data during the attacks and the apparent significant deviation reported by Nelson and Radin existed only in their chosen time window.[20] Spikes and fluctuations are to be expected in any random distribution of data, and there is no set time frame for how close a spike has to be to a given event for the GCP to say they have found a correlation.[20] Wolcotte Smith said "A couple of additional statistical adjustments would have to be made to determine if there really was a spike in the numbers," referencing the data related to September 11, 2001.[21] Similarly, Jeffrey D. Scargle believes unless both Bayesian and classical p-value analysis agree and both show the same anomalous effects, the kind of result GCP proposes will not be generally accepted.[22]

The Global Consciousness Project's 911 data did not indicate any precognitive response/reaction or suggest paranormal cognition simultaneous with the minutes during which the actual attacks took place, but I think it demonstrates striking effects on the RNGs resulting, I would guess, from the immense shock and empathy (and in some places joy) felt as people around the world learned of the event that day.

But aside from all the doubt from the skeptical and university folk who reflect on this work I'd be curious to know what you think of the critique of looking for pre-cognition, or reverse causality, or even remote viewing when it comes from more of a paranormal insider like Hansen: Princeton [PEAR] Remote-Viewing Experiments -- A Critique

That's a question of three distinct parts and I don't have a point of view about all of them. I think there is manifest evidence of the reality of precognition, investigated not only in the last 100 years but additionally recorded over several millennia. I am not familiar with 'reverse causality' or the literature surrounding it. I think there have been remarkable examples of remote viewing. I haven't read Hansen's piece.
 

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