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Another theory on UFO's

Sean Elifritz

Administrator
Well yeah, I think it's glaringly obvious that ball lightning is the cause of some UFO reports. There's a kzillion different things that lead to false reports.
 

CapnG

Devil's Advocate
Ball lightning doesn't strike me as particularily solid, metallic or prone to leaving impressions in the soil.
 

Facius_Cardan

Skilled Investigator
There's nothing new in the association of some UFO sightings to meteor showers and ball lighting. The latter phenomenon, as I said in an earlier post, is a mystery of its own, for we still don't know exactly what causes it and what its physical and chemical properties are. It can certainly explain many of the foo fighter sightings during World War II (the description of both appearance and movement surely seems similar enough to me).
Again, these don't (and will never) explain all UFO sightings.
 

blowfish

Whittingham
There's nothing new in the association of some UFO sightings to meteor showers and ball lighting. The latter phenomenon, as I said in an earlier post, is a mystery of its own, for we still don't know exactly what causes it and what its physical and chemical properties are. It can certainly explain many of the foo fighter sightings during World War II (the description of both appearance and movement surely seems similar enough to me).
Again, these don't (and will never) explain all UFO sightings.
Agree UFO's seem to come in all colors, shapes and sizes from eyewitness accounts which don't seem to agree with ball lighting theory. The foo fighters could well of been these so called balls of lighting . Although WW2 bombers Veterans on all sides saw these foo fighters and allied pilots gave credible witness testimonies about these foo fighters were able to move away from gun fire?
 

Facius_Cardan

Skilled Investigator
Ball lighting is a very interesting phenomenon. We have some fairly good reports of sightings that occured both out in the open and inside houses/airplanes. The movement of the luminous ball is quite fascinating, often exhibiting sudden turns in direction. One of the best cases I've read and heard about is one that occured inside a commercial flight. One of the witnesses was an american physicist (I'd have to check the name) and he reported seeing a ball of light slowly crossing the plane's central corridor, to the surprise of the passengers and flight assistants. The ball suddenly changed direction and exited the plane's interior. It's curious to notice that ball lighting often goes through walls and other solid barriers without causing any damage but, when going through a window for instance, can brake it or cause a circular cut on the glass surface (much like the ones that can be produced with a diamond cutter).
 

TClaeys

Skilled Investigator
One comment in the article says ball lightning is not fully understood. Well, to be quite honest and truthful, ball lightning isn't understood AT ALL. It has never been reproduced in a lab. Scientists have no idea how it works and have no solid theory of even how it could work. In fact many scientists think it may not exist at all and may be an illusion.

So while many reports of luminous balls of light are still reported it is not to say that a normal everyday electrical or atmospheric phenomena is responsible. We don't know. For all we know it could be luminous intelligent entities entering our world. I don't think that is the case, but it seems to me that it is a bit ironic that some people want explain away a mysterious phenomena with another mysterious phenomena to which we are equally ignorant. It doesn't get us anywhere in understanding it.

I guess they are just assuming that whatever it is, it isn't any kind of intelligence or anything under intelligent control. And to that I would say we still honestly don't know. I would bet that is probably true but sometimes these things seem to "have a mind of their own".
 

Facius_Cardan

Skilled Investigator
One comment in the article says ball lightning is not fully understood. Well, to be quite honest and truthful, ball lightning isn't understood AT ALL. It has never been reproduced in a lab. Scientists have no idea how it works and have no solid theory of even how it could work. In fact many scientists think it may not exist at all and may be an illusion.
That's quite true. Some experiences were made, nonetheless, to try to reproduce ball lighting on the lab. One of the most intersting was conducted at Los Alamos by Professor James Tuck, a british physicist who was involved in the Manhattan Project. Having heard stories from the U.S. Navy that reckless switching of submarine batteries could produce fire balls that burned soldier’s legs, Dr. Tuck convinced his partners on their lunch hours to participate on an experiment. In the premises where they built the atomic bomb there was a large obsolete submarine battery as big as a powerstation. Before the battery was due to be dismantled, the group surrounded the switchgear with a small concentration of methane gas, placed the cameras and hid behind sandbags. Due to a small blunder in the mixture of the gas, the switch exploded leading the experiment to a failure – or so they thought. Days later, after the recorded videos were processed, Tuck and his team noticed a strange object in the last frames, about 3 inches in diameter, which came toward the camera, bounced on the floor and exited the frame. He thought that this small floating body bore the characteristics of ball lightning, as it seemed to go through an object coming out on the other side. Yet, because this was an unrepeatable experiment, he said he couldn't claim to have created ball lightning, since that process would require repeated tests and analysis. Below I added a frame from the aforementioned video.
 

Attachments

Christopher O'Brien

Back in the Saddle Aginn
Staff member
From Yahoo News: "Instead, Hughes suggests it might have been ball lightning, mysterious glowing orbs of light usually seen during thunderstorms. The green fireball might have provided an electrical connection between the ground and the ionized layer of atmosphere known as the ionosphere, providing the energy needed for ball lightning."

[Now that is an interesting theory. If true, this would be a new, as-yet undefined natural phenomenon that is similar to ball-lightning, but created by a different electrical process---Chris]
 

Charles Swenson

Cthonic Charlie, Chronic Curmudgeon
Facing, walking.jpg

Ball lightning is one consideration, especially with the green fireballs over New Mexico in mid-century, some foo fighter phenomena, distant balls of light and the ilk.
It doesn't cover all the unending variety of phenomena that are seen in the sky, but it is one acknowledged phenomena that is as open to misinterpretation as the planet Venus, weather balloons, lighted advertising messages trailed behind airplanes at night (been fooled by that one!) and innumerable others.

Wish I could say I've had experience with it myself, but my wife has. She was walking out onto the porch with the dog one morning when a ball of light emerged from the area of the light socket, danced lazily across the ceiling and then when it reached the outer edge of the porch just shot on up into the sky. The dog was as confounded by it as she was!
 

Xylo

Paranormal Adept
Ball lighting is a very interesting phenomenon. We have some fairly good reports of sightings that occured both out in the open and inside houses/airplanes. The movement of the luminous ball is quite fascinating, often exhibiting sudden turns in direction. One of the best cases I've read and heard about is one that occured inside a commercial flight. One of the witnesses was an american physicist (I'd have to check the name) and he reported seeing a ball of light slowly crossing the plane's central corridor, to the surprise of the passengers and flight assistants. The ball suddenly changed direction and exited the plane's interior. It's curious to notice that ball lighting often goes through walls and other solid barriers without causing any damage but, when going through a window for instance, can brake it or cause a circular cut on the glass surface (much like the ones that can be produced with a diamond cutter).
What if the phenomena which we call "Ball Lightning" really are little light UFOs?
 

blowfish

Whittingham
What if the phenomena which we call "Ball Lightning" really are little light UFOs?
It could be UFO's which does mean anything that cannot be explained. Might it be 'dimensional 'rips in the fabrication of gravity if its possible combined with atmospheric gas ? Who knows? but the study does suggest they have reproduce it in laboratory as Ron suggests:)
 

Xylo

Paranormal Adept
I think this is because they can reproduce this effect in a lab setting.
Or approximated it at least. Very difficult to say that a phenomena has been replicated when the true nature of that phenomena is unknown and it's quanta unmeasured.
 

TClaeys

Skilled Investigator
I think this is because they can reproduce this effect in a lab setting.
It really hasn't though Ron. Scientists have tried for a long time only to come up with non-repeatable experiments that have varying results. Still we don't have a handle on what this ball lightning phenomena is, how it could possibly work, and if it even exists. I'll see what else I can dig up, but to my knowledge no scientist has ever clamied to have produced and measured ball lightning in a lab setting.
 


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