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A recent UFO case with iPhone photos and video

Thomas R Morrison

Paranormal Adept
Here’s a fun recent case that I heard about in a recent interview with Jeff Krause, State Dirtector of MUFON Southern California, which features two photos and a 21-second video clip taken by a 9-year-old girl using her aunt’s iPhone looking out the car window. First she took this photo:


And then she got a slightly better image:


And then she took this intriguing video, and after the ufo moves behind a building, she rather matter-of-factly states “K, that space ship just went behind that building.” Check it out:


I think this is a good example of a key issue that we’ve discussed here lately: the resolution and clarity of images and video of an object in the sky taken at any significant distance with an iPhone. This object is about as close we can expect to see, and the clarity here is about as good as we can expect to get with an iPhone camera (without attaching a special telephoto lens or going into the settings to maximize the resolution). And here we can’t even be sure if this is some strange radiant alien device hovering in the sky, or if it’s an airplane in slightly foggy conditions coming toward us with its landing lights on. That’s my point: any images or videos that we’re likely to get from smartphones or security cameras aren’t going to be sufficient to discern what we’re seeing with any real confidence.

So that’s why I don’t buy the argument that the smartphone revolution should be yielding a barrage of compelling ufo photos and videos. And that’s why I still find radar cases and pilot testimony and multiple-witness cases to be more important than the images that people can get with a phone.
 

sasysquatchgirl

Paranormal Maven
Here’s a fun recent case that I heard about in a recent interview with Jeff Krause, State Dirtector of MUFON Southern California, which features two photos and a 21-second video clip taken by a 9-year-old girl using her aunt’s iPhone looking out the car window. First she took this photo:


And then she got a slightly better image:


And then she took this intriguing video, and after the ufo moves behind a building, she rather matter-of-factly states “K, that space ship just went behind that building.” Check it out:


I think this is a good example of a key issue that we’ve discussed here lately: the resolution and clarity of images and video of an object in the sky taken at any significant distance with an iPhone. This object is about as close we can expect to see, and the clarity here is about as good as we can expect to get with an iPhone camera (without attaching a special telephoto lens or going into the settings to maximize the resolution). And here we can’t even be sure if this is some strange radiant alien device hovering in the sky, or if it’s an airplane in slightly foggy conditions coming toward us with its landing lights on. That’s my point: any images or videos that we’re likely to get from smartphones or security cameras aren’t going to be sufficient to discern what we’re seeing with any real confidence.

So that’s why I don’t buy the argument that the smartphone revolution should be yielding a barrage of compelling ufo photos and videos. And that’s why I still find radar cases and pilot testimony and multiple-witness cases to be more important than the images that people can get with a phone.
I’m definitely agreeing that the iPhone may create more questions then answers with its resolution and clarity limitations. I had a strange occurrence happen to me in a forest and the picture we caught was so poor I don’t know what I caught.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Thomas R Morrison

Paranormal Adept
I’m definitely agreeing that the iPhone may create more questions then answers with its resolution and clarity limitations. I had a strange occurrence happen to me in a forest and the picture we caught was so poor I don’t know what I caught.
This is a fascinating issue, so I was just reading up on comparisons between the acuity of the human eye and modern digital cameras, and this analysis found that the human eye has an equivalent pixel density of about 576 megapixels, whereas the iPhone 7 takes up to 12 megapixel images, so the human eye has roughly 48 times the image density:
Clarkvision Photography - Resolution of the Human Eye

But then the human eye also has an amazing range of adaptable parameters to compensate for varying conditions, as well, which leaves digital cameras in the dust, especially with regard to low lighting conditions and rapid focusing and image tracking, etc. It would probably be generous to say that the modern digital iPhone camera compares to the human eye, as a Ford Model T compares to a 2018 Ferrari.

So it would seem that people who try to take photos of something strange that's glimpsed at a distance in the woods, like the possible Bigfoot phenomenon, are up against a problem very similar to that of UFO witnesses: it's far, far easier to see such a thing clearly with your eyeball and brain working together with sublime proficiency, than it is to take a clear photo of what you've seen. When you think about it, the sophistication of biological systems like the human visual apparatus, are really a very advanced form of nanotechnology. And as amazing as the modern iPhone camera is, it's still nowhere near that level of sophistication. And the average video surveillance camera is far more crude than even an iPhone camera. Therefore we shouldn't be surprised by the dearth of photographic and video evidence, compared to the number of compelling sighting reports - until our smartphone camera technology makes many more large strides forward, we cannot reasonably expect witnesses to be able to show us what they've seen with their own two eyes.
 

Thomas R Morrison

Paranormal Adept
I'd like to go one step better, when's been the last time any of us ever heard a falcon,hawk, or osprey go on and on about a ufo?
Jeez I hadn't even thought about that - if we had eagle vision, we could make out an ant on the ground from the top of a 10-story building, and we'd have vastly superior color resolution as well, and we'd be able to see into the UV spectrum too (I didn't know that birds of prey could see UV light until I read the article below). Apparently these birds can resolve imagery at a distance 4 to 5 times greater than human vision (that would put them in the range of 10+ Gigapixel resolution, roughly 1000 times greater than the iPhone 7):
What If Humans Had Eagle Vision?
 


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