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Your Paracast Newsletter — October 4, 2020

Gene Steinberg

Forum Super Hero
Staff member
The Paracast Newsletter
October 4, 2020
www.theparacast.com

Researcher Bill Kousoulas Explores Mothman and Other Paranormal Mysteries on The Paracast!


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This Week's Episode: Gene and Randall present paranormal researcher Bill Kousoulas. In 2003, he was introduced to “The Mothman Prophecies” movie, and it truly changed his life. Since then, he has read nearly all of John Keel’s research, as well as the works of similar authors including Gray Barker, Andrew Colvin, and Brent Raynes, and he will discuss Mothman, the MIB and other strange phenomena that has impacted Point Pleasant, West Virginia. Since 2016, Bill and his wife Jaci have visited that city regularly. He is completing his PhD in psychology, with a focus on post-traumatic growth. Bill and Jaci are also in the preliminary stages of a phenomenological study that will examine the correlations between paranormal experiences and post-traumatic growth.

J. Randall Murphy's Ufology Society International: Ufology Society International (USI) - Explore the UFO Phenomenon

Stephen Bassett's Paradigm Research: Home - Paradigm Research Group

After The Paracast -- Available exclusively for Paracast+ subscribers on October 4: UFO disclosure lobbyist Stephen Bassett returns with an update about the Pentagon UAP Task Force, and how he expects efforts to reveal the truth about the phenomenon to turn out through early 2021. He covers the ongoing political byplay, the potential impact of the election for President, and why the decades of previous research doesn’t appear to play a part in the current situation. Bassett is the executive director of Paradigm Research Group, founded in 1996, to end what he describes as a government imposed embargo on the truth behind the UFO phenomenon. He has spoken to audiences around the world about what he feels are the implications of disclosure by world governments of what he regards as an extraterrestrial presence engaging the human race.

Reminder: Please don't forget to visit our famous Paracast Community Forums for the latest news/views/debates on all things paranormal: The Paracast Community Forums. Check out our new YouTube channel at: The Official Paracast Channel

Are We Seeing What’s Really There?

By Gene Steinberg

As you realize, eyewitness testimony can be quite unreliable. Put 10 people in a room and ask them to describe a sudden or unexpected event, and they will have different descriptions, sometimes very different.

Obviously. this makes the job of law enforcement in solving a crime, or just determining whose at fault in a fender bender, all the more difficult. But it’s usually the mix of testimony and evidence that leads to a conclusion, or what they hope is a conclusion.

With UFO sightings, of course, it’s mostly testimony, and having multiple witnesses is a huge benefit. That way investigators can sift through what may be different versions of what was seen and try to reach some sort of consensus.

When there’s possible physical evidence, it can also be of mixed value. Take photos and videos. With the wealth of sophisticated cameras in the pockets of hundreds of millions of Earthlings courtesy of their smartphones, it’s not too hard to make fakes. And even when an honest attempt is made to record something strange, a distant object may appear as little more than a light or a blinking light. It doesn’t tell you what it is.

Over the decades, there have been precious few compelling photos of strange aircraft, and most of them are disputed in one way or another. It almost seems as if the UFOs — or whatever controls the phenomenon — are not terribly photogenic. You’d think with so many sightings that there’d be a wealth of convincing photographic evidence, and there isn’t.

Of course there are also those cases where electronic and mechanical gadgetry appear to fail in the vicinity of the phenomenon, and that’s a mystery all by itself. Again, maybe it doesn’t want you to get evidence.

From time to time there is trace evidence. The late Ted Phillips spent many a decade analyzing what UFOs appear to leave behind, such as possible impressions in the ground made by landing gear, but there have been no smoking guns. Ditto with the late Dr. Roger Leir’s alleged alien implants. Where is the proof of advanced technology that no self-respecting scientist can refute?

It almost seems as if we are not meant to find the smoking gun. The phenomenon doesn’t mind being seen or chased, but not captured. Even if the Roswell crash — and the other events where the wreckage of crashed flying saucers was allegedly recovered — were real, such episodes might represent unfortunate accidents.

Maybe ET also has to deal with the lowest bidder, or awarding the contracts to construct starships to the builders who bribe the officials who make the decisions. Why assume they don’t suffer from some of the same political irregularities that affect Earth people?

The search for evidence, though, heavily depends on the assumption that we are seeing precisely what is actually there. Maybe our “visitors” give off signals that are undetectable by human eyes, or our instrumentation, but is what you see what you get?

But what if ET has perfected technology that resembles Star Trek’s Holodeck? Thus it can project a seemingly solid image of something that leaves physical evidence. If you get close enough, you can touch it. If the image appears to land, it leaves impressions in the ground. It’s all real.

That doesn’t mean the actual object isn’t being camouflaged. Just as it might be able to make itself invisible to us via some sort of cloaking device, it can project false images that alter its appearance, or present something that isn’t even there.

This may all seem fanciful, but don’t forget that humans have long worked on technology to conceal the machines of war so they aren’t readily detected by the enemy. So stealth aircraft are designed to make them harder to detect visibly or via instrumentation. They are not invisible in the sense that we regard as invisible, but give it time.

Now imagine a civilization that is hundreds or thousands of years ahead of us, and is perfectly capable of manipulating our senses and our detection devices to record things that do not at all represent what’s really there.

Why? Well, for obvious reasons, such as the possibility that the actual appearance of their spacecraft — or its crew — would be less acceptable to us.

Take “Arrival,” a compelling film that depicts a linguist trying to communicate with a race of aliens that come in gigantic ships. They appear squid-like, have seven legs, and are referred to as heptapods.

In the context of the film, they are not at all horrifying, but imagine seeing a few of them scurrying around the countryside. Imagine those B-movie sci-fi “aliens on the loose” films from the 1950s. They’d frighten eyewitnesses, whereas little grays with big heads and eyes are mostly curiosities; well, so long as they don’t show up in your bedroom at night to take you through the walls of your home on the way to an operating table in their spaceship.

In the movie, “Contact,” a supposed alien appears to the protagonist, a radio astronomer, in the form of her deceased father so as to be more acceptable. You wonder what it might have really looked like; imagine if it were a heptapod, and how would she have reacted to that?

So concealment makes sense, but why let us see it at all? If we aren’t meant to see how ET really looks, wouldn’t it be better to go about their business invisible to us?

Unless we are meant to see what we see, for reasons only they know. Perhaps we are being inspired to perfect space travel, with UFOs leading us the way to our future. When ET exhorts contactees and channelers to live in peace, they may be telling us that, if we travel to space, perhaps to their planet, they’d prefer to greet us as friends and not as potential invaders.

But that still assumes the existence of physical ETs that have motivations that we can, by and large, understand in human terms.

If the phenomenon isn’t physical and doesn’t involve interstellar travelers, it raises all sorts of possibilities. Consider a universal consciousness taking us on a journey to the future, a race of ultraterrestrials who are just playing games with us, or maybe we are all part of some highly advanced video game. It would surely take AI to a level way beyond anything we can duplicate.

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