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Your Paracast Newsletter — January 24, 2021

Gene Steinberg

Forum Super Hero
Staff member
The Paracast Newsletter
January 24, 2021
www.theparacast.com


Explore UFOs From the Future with Dr. Michael P. Masters on The Paracast!

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This Week's Episode: Gene and Randall take a journey through time and space with biological anthropologist Dr. Michael P. Masters, author of Identified Flying Objects: A Multidisciplinary Scientific Approach to the UFO Phenomenon. The book challenges readers to consider new possibilities while cultivating conversations about our ever-evolving understanding of time and time travel. In other words, whether UFOs are piloted by humans from our future. Dr. Masters also discusses his next book, which focuses on abductions. Collectively, his background, education, and current research program combine to offer a unique perspective and novel approach to addressing unanswered questions pertaining to a widely recognized yet poorly understood aspect of modern global culture.

J. Randall Murphy's Ufology Society International: Ufology Society International (USI) - Explore the UFO Phenomenon

Dr. Michael P. Masters' Site: https://idflyobj.com/

After The Paracast -- Available exclusively for Paracast+ subscribers on January 24: Gene and Randall are revisited by professor and biological anthropologist Dr. Michael P. Masters. Rather than just focusing on the possibility of UFOs being time travelers, the topic of his book, Identified Flying Objects: A Multidisciplinary Scientific Approach to the UFO Phenomenon. he considers whether they also visited us in our past, thus becoming what we call ancient astronauts. Or were there advanced human civilizations in our past? Over the years, Dr. Masters has developed a broad academic background, which began studying physics and astronomy at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, with further undergraduate and graduate coursework in astrobiology, statistics, astronomy, and physics along with a perennial review of developments in modern physics regarding time and time travel.

Reminder: Please don't forget to visit our famous Paracast Community Forums for the latest news/views/debates on all things paranormal: The Paracast Community Forums. Check out our new YouTube channel at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheOfficialParacastChannel

Visiting the Past — or the Future?

By Gene Steinberg

We are endlessly fascinated by stories of time travel. So it would be great to journey back to an important historical event to see how it really occurred, not just from a history book where someone’s agenda might have influenced the interpretation.

But when you travel back through time, sci-fi writers have conjured all sorts of potential complications from being there.

So what if you meet your younger self? Would one of you go “poof” due to some conflict in the time-space continuum? What if you met up with your parents before you were born, such as in “Back to the Future,” where Marty McFly had to convince his dad to gain the courage to meet his mom so he’d continue to exist? And, as you recall, he changed a thing or two along the way, so the parents encountered when he returned to his own time were not quite the ones he grew up with.

The theory being that if you change something, even accidentally, there could be huge consequences. Not so much for swatting a fly, unless that fly, buzzing at the face of someone driving a convertible, is the cause of a serious accident. Suddenly, lots of things will change, and there’s no way to predict the impact — until, of course, it all plays out.

Now if there are multiple universes, perhaps the act of changing time has the effect of creating an another reality where the altered future plays out. Or maybe it was all meant to be, but that would also mean that the events you remembered might have changed somehow.

Or that everything is preordained which, as a practical matter, might make one’s life quite boring since you’d have no way to change things from the way it was all meant to be.

And what about the so-called “Mandela Effect,” where people remember events in very different ways? So the South African revolutionary leader may have died in prison, or at least some people remember it that way. But in our “real” universe, he was freed and became President of his country.

As a practical matter, maybe it’s the fault of our imperfect memories, and when people debate drastically different versions of the day’s events, they are just coping. Or perhaps they are both right. They are reporting experiences that were genuine; well, at least until some alteration in the time stream came into play.

That takes us back to time travel, one of the theories about the origin of UFOs.

So rather than visit us from another planet somewhere out there in the vast reaches of space, they are our future selves, back here for visits. Or maybe they, too, want to change history to alter the nasty consequences that play out in their own time. But wouldn’t that change possibly alter the conditions of their own existence, so they couldn’t travel through time to meddle with the past?

Of course, that doesn’t stop sci-fi writers from playing with the theory. Sometimes the consequences are a source of humor, as they were in “Back to the Future,” and also in a CW network TV show, “Legends of Tomorrow.”

That show depicts a group of second-tier super heroes who travel through space and time in a device called “Waverider.” Their job is to right the wrongs of the past to prevent, say, prehistoric creatures from overwhelming Los Angeles.

While I’m not really a fan, the show is a romp and it exploits the humor of the hapless heroes trying to fix the broken time stream and almost always messing up a few fine details that create their own complexities. That, of course, is fodder for the following week’s episode.

In “Timecop,” which was both a movie and a short-lived TV series, there was an agency of time guardians who went back through time to prevent the villains from altering events to their advantage. Or to undo the damage.

But what about time travelers visiting the future? In that case, there would not be the potential consequences of altering a timeline. You’d be dealing with events that haven’t happened yet.

In the novelette “Armageddon 2491 A.D.” from Philip Frances Nowlan, a former soldier checks out strange phenomena in an abandoned coal mine. It’s 1927, and our hero is put into a state of suspended animation by some sort of radioactive gas, says the story. He awakens 492 years later, a veritable Rip Van Winkle, thinking he’s only been asleep for a few hours or days.

The protagonist, Anthony “Buck” Rogers, becomes a hero to the people of the 25th century in their battles against the evil overlords who now control Earth. The adventures of Rogers became fodder for comic books, a radio show, a movie serial, and even a TV show. There’s even talk of reviving the character for a possible live-action series, perhaps even an animated version.

Again, Buck Rogers didn’t exactly travel through time. He slept through it, in contrast to the protagonist in the 1895 H.G. Wells novel, ‘The Time Machine.” Here an inventor from Victorian England builds a machine that transports him to the far future. Now in the original story, his name is never mentioned. He’s referred to as “Time Traveller,” in contrast with the 1960 film version, starring Rod Taylor, in which the character is invested with the name “George.”

In the story, George takes his machine to the year 802,701, where he encounters a race of innocent and attractive adults, the Eloi. The Eloi, who subsist on fruit, are frequently invaded and kidnapped by the subsurface dwellers, the Morlocks, horrible cannibalistic creatures that crave the Eloi for their dinner.

Now believe it or not, but one Richard S. Shaver, who claimed to have been in touch with subsurface beings known as Deros, the bad guys, and Teros, the good guys, suggested that Wells based his novel, in part, on the reality of the cavern dwellers. In other words, the Morlocks were, in fact, Deros.

Regardless, if I had my choice in the matter, I would probably prefer to travel to the future. No, not so much out of concerns about what my presence in the past might do, but on seeing with my own eyes the realization of all those sci-fi stories about how humans will fare going forward. I would only hope our future will be closer to the optimistic one depicted in “Star Trek,” rather than the far-future nightmare depicted in “The Time Machine.”

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Randall

J. Randall Murphy
Staff member
The Paracast Newsletter January 24, 2021

... Regardless, if I had my choice in the matter, I would probably prefer to travel to the future. No, not so much out of concerns about what my presence in the past might do, but on seeing with my own eyes the realization of all those sci-fi stories about how humans will fare going forward. I would only hope our future will be closer to the optimistic one depicted in “Star Trek,” rather than the far-future nightmare depicted in “The Time Machine.”
There's a whole lot of problems associated with time travel that sci-fi glosses over for the sake of plot, to the point where in most cases it's become a plot device rather adding anything meaningful to the script. Even Masters, who is a PhD, didn't realize that Novakov's Self Consistency Conjecture, is exactly that ( a conjecture ), meaning it has the potential to scientifically explain something, but there's no evidence that it does.

It arbitrarily assumes that block time is constructed in a way that all routes leading back in time have a zero probability of creating a paradox. In other words, they've always gone back in time without a paradox, just like everything else has "always been" the way it is in the overall picture. There's nothing impossible about this model, but it seems very unlikely to me, and not nearly as parsimonious as Masters suggests.

However I didn't want to lean on him quite as hard during this episode. I think there is value in looking for an explanation as to why the aliens are so much like us, if not seemingly identical to us, and possibly even genetically compatible. A simpler answer would be that they had a hand in creating life on Earth, and patterned us after them.

Add time dilation into the picture and there's no need to invoke any exotic theories about this universe or any other. The aliens could simply be a space faring race that likes to go around starting life on planets, and then come back to check-up on it once in a while.
 
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