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Your Paracast Newsletter — February 23, 2020


Gene Steinberg

Forum Super Hero
Staff member
THE PARACAST NEWSLETTER
February 23, 2020

www.theparacast.com

Explore Scientific UFO Research, Disclosure and More with Richard Hoffman on The Paracast

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This Week's Episode: Gene and Randall feature a return visit from Richard Hoffman, an Executive Board Member for the Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies (SCU), who has been investigating the UFO phenomenon for over 52 years. He first got involved in UFO researcher as a teenager when he was assigned a school paper on the subject. His curiosity resulted in a lifelong pursuit of the truth behind the mystery. Over the years, Rich has explored a number of fascinating UFO cases, some of which he'll describe on this episode. This interview will also focus heavily on the latest developments in UAP research, and the possibility of disclosure; that is, if there's anything to disclose.

J. Randall Murphy's Ufology Society International: Ufology Society International (USI) - Explore the UFO Phenomenon

Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies: Home | The SCU

William Puckett's Blog: UFO Reporting Center, Latest UFO Sightings & News.

After The Paracast -- Available exclusively for Paracast+ subscribers on February 23: Gene and Randall feature a return visit from Richard Hoffman, an Executive Board Member for the Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies (SCU), who has been investigating the UFO phenomenon for over 52 years. He first got involved in UFO researcher as a teenager when he was assigned a school paper on the subject. His curiosity resulted in a lifelong pursuit of the truth behind the mystery. Over the years, Rich has explored a number of fascinating UFO cases, some of which he'll describe on this episode. This interview will also focus heavily on the latest developments in UAP research, and the possibility of disclosure; that is, if there's anything to disclose. .

Reminder: Please don't forget to visit our famous Paracast Community Forums for the latest news/views/debates on all things paranormal: The Paracast Community Forums. Check out our new YouTube channel at: The Official Paracast Channel

Is it Real or a Simulation?
By Gene Steinberg

It is a key goal of science fiction to attempt to predict future technology. Traveling through space is a given. Most commonly, it’s done via interstellar craft, stargates, wormholes, and other methods of transportation.

Obviously, the expectations of even the most talented sci-fi writers are based to a large extent on the science of today, and attempts to extrapolate where it’s destined to go. Well, with variations, such as depicting beings that have control over matter, perhaps existing separate from our reality, and can thus create things at will, traveling anywhere instantaneously.

Star Trek’s “Q Continuum” is just one example of such a species, though they hardly seemed to be any further developed beyond that singular capability.

In what we presume to be the real world, we view UFOs (or UAPs) on the basis of our current achievements. As we attempt to analyze their capabilities — assuming they are physical aircraft of course — we still base it on our own technology and where we assume it’s heading.

Now on this weekend’s episode of The Paracast, Randall and I were talking about some UFOs being holograms. Our guest, Richard Hoffman, views holography in terms of present-day developments. If UFOs are just projections, how can they be seen by eyewitnesses and simultaneously be tracked on radar?

What about all that trace evidence examined by such researcher as Ted Phillips, consisting of depressions in the ground, burnt shrubbery, and so forth and so on.

If UFOs are leaving such evidence of solidity, how could they be holographic projections? After all, holograms are just images, not so different from the film you see at the multiplex. They are not physical objects that can leave evidence of their presence.

But that impression is based on the way we do it, not what an advanced civilization is capable of.

Consider that Star Trek has been a singular inspiration for technological achievements. The original Motorola StarTAC mobile phone (including the name), and the clamshell devices that followed it, were clearly influenced by the Star Trek communicator. Such multipurpose gadgets as smartphones and smartwatches bring to mind the tricorder, only they do far more.

One of the more fascinating developments in the Star Trek universe was the introduction of the holodeck in the Next Generation series.

Although usually limited to a single chamber, a ship’s onboard computer would create a fully functional simulation of reality, one that fills our senses. Objects can be felt, food can be eaten, punches can be felt.

And what if someone is murdered during a holodeck simulation? Does that result in the actual death to a living being?

At least that’s what Star Trek’s writing and production team envisioned for the 24th century. Or at least their concept of our civilization more than 300 years from now.

But it didn’t stop there. In a spin-off series, Star Trek: Voyager, we were introduced to the Holographic Doctor, played with gusto by Robert Picardo.

He existed on the ship, outside of the holodeck, and was meant to act as a short-term replacement or supplement to a ship’s doctor. Since Voyager didn’t have a live medical officer, the holographic version became a permanent replacement.

See the Holographic Doctor in action:


Over the life of the series, he was given more abilities and, as I recall, was eventually outfitted with a devise to allow him to leave the ship and beam down on a planet, same as any other crew member. So in this respect, the Holographic Doctor became another life form.

Sure, this was a clever sci-fi gimmick, and Picardo’s outstanding performance made the character all the more believable. But it raises a larger question: When does an artificial creation, a projection, become real? Would it be possible for an advanced civilization to actually generate holograms that, for all intents and purposes, are near as real as a living being or spaceship?

So this would mean that a holographic flying saucer could be seen visually and captured on film and radar. It would leave trace evidence.

Why ET would project an artificial creation in this fashion is anyone’s guess. Perhaps it’s meant to divert our attention from the real phenomenon, whatever it is. Or it’s designed as an experiment with which to test our reaction to the presence of their spacecraft.

If hostile humans decide to fire on such craft, no harm done. And this might also explain how and why they appear to blink in and blink out again. It’s akin to turning the on/off switch.

Of course, this is taking AI to the next level. We’d no longer need special goggles with which to enter this simulated world.

It might also serve as a suitable substitute for sending living beings out in space to explore a strange world. ET itself could simply remain on its home world and somehow experience what the projection experiences. Only they can turn it all off at will without any impact to themselves.

It sure seems to be a lazy way to explore outer space. The craft that contains the holographic mechanisms might even be robotically controlled.

This reminds me of some sci-fi novels I read years ago, in which future humans would download their intellect (soul?) to clones or simulations that would do the actual space exploration. When they returned from their mission, the entire experience would be uploaded to the original person. It would become part of their life’s experience without actually having to go anywhere and do anything; well, beyond managing the system that accomplishes the transfer.

Or maybe it’s more akin to the movie Total Recall (the original 1990 version), where someone sits in a chair in a laboratory, and is provided with a, to them, real experience without having to go anywhere. But if this was done in real time, one wonders how such essentials as food, water, and, to be blunt, expelling waste, would be handled.

In any case, I think the fictional concepts are sufficient to present the possibility that an advanced hologram could involve far more than the projection of an image.

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