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Your Paracast Newsletter — December 6, 2020



Gene Steinberg

Forum Super Hero
Staff member
The Paracast Newsletter
December 6, 2020
www.theparacast.com


UFO Scientist Robert Powell Talks About His Ongoing Research and His New Book About UFOs for Preteens on The Paracast!

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This Week's Episode: Gene and Randall present scientist and UFO investigator Robert Powell. Robert is a member of the Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies (SCU), the UFODATA project, and the National Space Society. He is active with FOIA requests to various government organizations to obtain information on historical cases. His most recent book, "The Truth About UFOs: A Scientific Perspective," is an introductory text on the subject that is intended for readers ages 7-11. He is also co-author of "UFOs and Government: A Historical Inquiry." He is one of two authors of the detailed radar/witness report on the “Stephenville Lights,” as well as the SCU report "UAP: 2013 Aguadilla, Puerto Rico." Robert has a BS in Chemistry and is a former collegiate debater. He has 28 years experience in engineering management in the semiconductor industry.

J. Randall Murphy's Ufology Society International: Ufology Society International (USI) - Explore the UFO Phenomenon

Robert Powell: Robert Powell | The SCU

After The Paracast -- Available exclusively for Paracast+ subscribers on December 6: UFO investigator Robert Powell, a member of the Scientific Coalition for UAP Studies (UAP) continues the discussion that began on the December 6, 2020 episode of The Paracast. He talks about how he originally got involved in the field, the prospects for UFO disclosure in light of the creation of the Pentagon UAP Task Force, and how the government is handling the subject. Will they actually deliver the report requested by Congress within a six-month deadline, or just produce a set of excuses? He also offers some insights into a book he co-authored, "UFOs and Government: A Historical Inquiry," and how it was put together even though one of his fellow authors wasn't using a personal computer to produce and edit the manuscript.

Reminder: Please don't forget to visit our famous Paracast Community Forums for the latest news/views/debates on all things paranormal: The Paracast Community Forums. Check out our new YouTube channel at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheOfficialParacastChannel

Blending In

By Gene Steinberg

One of the more paranoid theories — or beliefs — in the UFO field is that “they” are living among us. “They” being extraterrestrial visitors that are either sufficiently humanoid to closely resemble us, or are in disguise.

Regardless, it’s not an illogical idea. One way for them to better understand humanity is to walk among us, live as we do, for whatever purpose they have. And that purpose might be either helpful or harmful.

So if we take some of those theories about alien/human hybrids, ET wants to slowly infiltrate human civilizations, gradually assume positions of power until the time is right for them to take over. All this without firing a shot, or even making us aware of their presence until they achieve their evil goals.

Of course, they’d also have to navigate the vagaries of politics or become dictators.

I suppose it’s possible to replace an existing person, and thus take over their lives. Mimicking the personage would be a matter not just of physical appearance and voice, but in acting in a way where the impersonation is not immediately obvious.

There would certainly appear to be ways that foreign invaders can do it, and an advanced civilization from another planet could make the impersonation more seamless.

Then again, I always wondered how, in the Superman comics, the Kents managed to have their adopted son, Clark, become accepted as a human child and attend school without benefit of an authenticated birth certificate. One could assume they’d cite religious reasons to avoid giving him vaccinations, unless, of course, his skin wasn’t impervious to needles until he grew older. The birth certificate could be falsified with the help of a willing accomplice I suppose.

One of my favorite depictions of an alien pretending to be a human was Klaatu in “The Day the Earth Stood Still.” I’m thinking of the original 1951 film starring Michael Rennie as the spaceman.

There he briefly assumes the identity of an Earth man to give himself a chance to become better acquainted with the local populace, in hopes he’d understand human behavior by his interactions.

I won’t dwell on the contradiction of having Klaatu speak perfect English with a UK accent and being otherwise quite human when examined by doctors at a hospital after he is wounded by a frightened soldier. Was that his true form, or one manufactured somehow for our benefit? Despite the ease with which he fit in, he seems otherwise naive about human behavior, particularly about our warlike tendencies.

Clearly it was those warlike tendencies that encouraged his people to send him here to give us a warning to straighten up or be destroyed in the interests of galactic peace.

One common sci-fi trope is to have a time traveler blend in to a local society, usually one in the past. We have “Quantum Leap,” and, more recently in the DC Comics show, “Legends of Tomorrow.”

In the latter, a hapless crew of would-be or almost super heroes flies around in a device known as the Waverider, a ship that can travel through both space and time. Each week, the crew makes barely successful attempts to infiltrate the local society in order to undo some catastrophic mistake in the time stream that negatively impacts the future.

The fun part of the show is that, more often than not, their acts to repair wrongs are imperfect enough to cause more havoc of a different sort.

In Star Trek, the crew of the Enterprise takes trips to the past and make lesser or greater efforts to adapt. In “Star Trek: The Voyage Home,” Captain Kirk, Spock and the rest of the crew return to the 20th century to retrieve a pair of humpback whales to take back to the 23rd century to somehow communicate with an advanced race that is, for unknown reasons, activating destructive forces that threaten to destroy the Earth.

The humor in this movie, directed by Leonard Nimoy, is the clumsy way in which they pretend to be 20th century inhabitants. I recall the scene where Scotty, first exposed to an Apple Macintosh computer, picks up the mouse and attempts to speak commands to it. “Computer,” he says, so prescient, except that, nowadays, we use such commands as “Siri” or “Alexa” to summon a voice assistant.

By far the most entertaining example of Star Trek crew members interacting with the past was “The City on the Edge of Forever,” where they journey via a time vortex. Regarded by many as the finest episode of the original series, its tragic ending showcases the acting skills of the stars. And, yes, William Shatner does a terrific job reacting to the revelation that he must allow a woman with whom he has fallen in love to die in order to save the future.

In passing, as much as we attack Shatner’s towering ego and the way he treated his fellow actors, he was once and always the perfect Captain Kirk. Sure, Chris Pine does it well in the recent movies, but he’s mostly just channeling Shatner in that iconic role.

In any case, have you ever wondered whether someone you may have encountered in your life might actually be a visitor form another planet pretending to be just another Earthling? Would that prospect make you paranoid about alien invaders, or would you come to an understanding that it would be a perfectly normal thing for ET to do in order to better understand humanity?

And if we have been infiltrated in this fashion, would there come a time for them to reveal themselves, or just to depart when their mission is accomplished? More to the point, would they be trading places with the “real” individual, or just pretending to be one of us?

How would they react to the way in which humans speculate about their presence? How, for example, would they react to an aging radio talk show host speculating about them in a newsletter?

In the early days of The Paracast, we used to speculate about whether any of our forum members were actually intelligence people from the CIA or other agencies, foreign or domestic. But what if one of you is really an alien visitor?

Would you ever let me in on your secret? And if you did, why should I believe you?

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