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Free card reading for forum members



Arthur

Skilled Investigator
I think I got the idea from red dwarf:


Quarantine (Red Dwarf) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Red Dwarf receives a signal from the hologram Dr. Hildegarde Lanstrom. The crew takes Starbug to visit the Viral Research Centre, where Lanstrom had been working on a theory that viruses can be positive as well as negative. Lanstrom had successfully isolated several positive viruses, including the "luck virus", which grants whomever contracts it extreme good luck.

Is Craig Charles bringing Red Dwarf back to the TV with a new series?
 

Mr. Fibuli

Paranormal Adept
I love the old ones, some great story lines. I didn't fancy the new one last time however
I love the first few seasons-super intelligent, super stylish. (Remember how Rimmer was derided for believing in aliens:p) Then came what I consider the 'Next Generation' with Kryten and action! Explosions! Awesomeness!
Then came the Next-best Gen with Kochanski. The smeg? I really love the new stuff too..Lister never grew up he's been spacewrecked forever and he's a fifty yearold manchild stuck in his mid-twenties. That alone cracks me up. Best incarnation of the Eternal Champion ever.
My top 5 alltime fave shows for context
1 The Lone Gunmen
2 Red Dwarf
3 Star Trek: The Next Generation
4 The Muppet Show
5 Iron Chef JAPAN, ORIGINAL
 

Han

piscator ψ
I love the old ones, some great story lines. I didn't fancy the new one last time however

I initially watched the first 7 series and then gave up, but I recently watched series 1-10 and they were not as bad as I thought they would be.
It is funny how time can change your opinion.
 

Han

piscator ψ
I love the first few seasons-super intelligent, super stylish. (Remember how Rimmer was derided for believing in aliens:p) Then came what I consider the 'Next Generation' with Kryten and action! Explosions! Awesomeness!
Then came the Next-best Gen with Kochanski. The smeg? I really love the new stuff too..Lister never grew up he's been spacewrecked forever and he's a fifty yearold manchild stuck in his mid-twenties. That alone cracks me up. Best incarnation of the Eternal Champion ever.
My top 5 alltime fave shows for context
1 The Lone Gunmen
2 Red Dwarf
3 Star Trek: The Next Generation
4 The Muppet Show
5 Iron Chef JAPAN, ORIGINAL

I have just watched up to episode 4 of the lone gunman and have enjoyed it so far. I was suprised at how old it was because, it does not seem dated at all (aside from some of the computer tech).
I especially enjoyed the opening to episode 2 when they tricked the whaling fleet owner into thinking he was in Osaka japan.

Thanks for the recommendation.
 

Mr. Fibuli

Paranormal Adept
I have just watched up to episode 4 of the lone gunman and have enjoyed it so far. I was suprised at how old it was because, it does not seem dated at all (aside from some of the computer tech).
I especially enjoyed the opening to episode 2 when they tricked the whaling fleet owner into thinking he was in Osaka japan.

Thanks for the recommendation.
I said it on my thread already but it knocks me out that he says he's supposed to be in Towson, Maryland (my home town 10 minutes north of Baltimore City):D
 

Mr. Fibuli

Paranormal Adept
I also think Jimmy Bond was a truly great character (I wasn't sure on the first appearance episode) who contrasted the guys brilliantly.
 

Robert Baird

Paranormal Maven
My deck fave is the Rider (AE Waite edition and the ten card spread) and I read the Tarot as well as palms for thousands or even tens of thousands of people - for free! Acting as a flux for 'what is" was my reward, I would say to those who said I was better than those who charged for it.

Alan Kazlev takes us into an interesting philosophical debate which sets Aurobindian New Age thought against effective or pragmatic moral possibilities which I think exist in Jung's collective unconscious. Jung had a healthy respect for Tarot and near his death was trying to bring together adepts from many disciplines to do a serious study to see what and how these divinatory arts operate. I think he would agree people chose to selectively apply any and all possibilities for personal gain and reasons not at all moral. We both seem to recognize the effort required for real discipline or esoteric insight is more than most people can endure. They seek mostly for materialistic 'easy answers' for ego and gain or power over others. I think people have been conditioned against thinking by schooling which never addressed compelling personal or purposeful (See Logotherapy) potentials.

"But just because a theory or explanation is popular doesn't mean it is correct. . An explanation may be popular not because it accurately maps reality, but because it is provides simplistic answers; junk food for the "soul" (i.e. For the aspiring part of the affective and mental being) right. Take for example, the belief in a supernatural deity tacked on to the secular-material understanding of the cosmos, and justified via exoteric religious scriptures and a lack of insight into science (sect 1-x). This is certainly popular, but it is popular because it does not require one to think outside the box. It simply takes two common and very traditional consensus viewpoints in western society (scientism-based physicalism and Judaeo-Christian religionism) and mashes them together without bothering to consider the real meaning or implications for either tradition."

http://www.integralworld.net/kazlev8.html

What can a person DO? Almost anything they set their mind to achieving is possible with elbow grease and confidence, so we are told by those ripping off the ancient Law of Attraction' or praying to some boogeyman. Yet it is the people selling partial truths who make major bucks while sheople end up being convinced they got what they deserved even if it is more or less than they otherwise might have achieved. Preying is a lot like praying, but what we need is a disciplined collective effort and plan. If half the effort spent on winning over others was spent helping through planned application of creative resources, imagine where we might now be?! Is it too late to start?

There is a great deal we need to learn before we can even begin a personal plan much less a realistic plan to apply all the potential of a community, country or even the planet. Education needs to focus on spiritual potential such as yoga does as I see it. But then people point out that India is poor or Lululemon is crazy. Sri Aurobindo's constant companion says these things about prophecy and I dare say planning is what makes prophecies come true.

"The Mother Mira Alfassa on astrology

The stars have no decisive influence. It is only if one does not believe in the Divine that one unnecessarily suffers by believing that they determine one’s life.

I have known many astrologers both in Europe and India. So far, nobody has been able to read the future correctly. There are three reasons for the failure.
1.First, the astrologers do not know how to read the future properly.
2.Secondly, the horoscope is always incorrectly made − unless a man is a mathematical genius. And even for such a person it is very difficult to make a correct horoscope.
3.Thirdly, when people say that the stars in this or that house at the time of birth rule your life, they are quite wrong. The stars under which you are born are only “tape-recorders” of physical conditions. They do not rule the future of the soul. There is something beyond, which rules the stars themselves and everything else. The soul belongs to this Supreme Being. And if it is doing Yoga, then all the more it should never believe in the power of the stars or in any other power.

An astrologer who predicts a catastrophe for you is like a joker. Many jokers say things like, “Today you will break your neck!” But in spite of the joke nothing happens.

Only a great Yogi can tell you your future correctly. But even then there is the Supreme Will which alone controls and decides everything.

The most important factor in a horoscope is the intuitive faculty of the astrologer."


https://auromere.wordpress.com/2012/...sri-aurobindo/

Do I believe in Divination? No I do not. Do I believe anything? Not much of anything would fall into the category of certainty for me, but I do believe or know many systems and forces which do influence the FUTURE POTENTIAL. There are alternate possibilities and free choice can overcome forces lining up to cause something different. I told my father this when I told him he would die when he was 65, and he replied something to the extent - 'If so, that is fine.' We buried him a day after his 65th birthday and he had just been given a clean bill of health to continue working past retirement. I am at that same point in life now. A few years ago I made some healthy choices that probably have extended my life a decade or so, but I don't fear death or meeting the future for my soul.
 

Robert Baird

Paranormal Maven
I have been called 'the best' reader of Tarot by many who I read for, I never charged or accepted (when offered) any money. I said it was a blessing and I was a conduit or flux that happened to work and which did not always work so well. I would congratulate the person on having centered themselves well which I always had them do before each reading as they held the cards and concentrated on their question.

Jungian psychoanalysis is borne from visions he saw, in many ways. His knowledge and scientific method was of the highest calibre. In this Tarot site we have a person worth reading talking about Jung's knowledge of the Tarot.


"Dierdre Bair recounts in Jung: A Biography (Little, Brown, 2003, p. 549) that in 1950 Jung assigned to each of the four members of his Psychology Club an ‘intuitive, synchronistic method’ to explore. Hanni Binder was to research the Tarot and teach him how to read the cards. They determined that Grimaud’s Ancien Tarot de Marseille “was the only deck that possessed the properties and fulfilled the requirements of metaphor that he gleaned from within the alchemical texts.” Hanni Binder’s work amounted to very little as can be seen from her report preserved at the Jung Institute in New York. The group disbanded around 1954.

What was behind Jung’s attempt to gather all this material? Marie-Louise von Franz recounts in Psyche and Matter (1988) that toward the end of his life:

Jung suggested investigating cases where it could be supposed that the archetypal layer of the unconscious is constellated*—following a serious accident, for instance, or in the midst of a conflict or divorce situation—by having people engage in a divinatory procedure: throwing the I Ching, laying the Tarot cards, consulting the Mexican divination calendar, having a transit horoscope or a geomantic reading done. If Jung’s hypothesis is accurate, the results of all these procedures should converge. . . . [*a Jungian term meaning ‘the coming together of elements in the unconscious so that they form a consciously recognizable pattern of relationships.’ Christine Houde adds, “The constellated material is activated in the psyche of the individual where it attempts to erupt into the field of experience.”]

“[This investigation would consist of] studying an incident (accident) by the convergence . . . of a multitude of methods, with the help of which we could try to find out what the Self “thought” of this particular accident. . . . The generally rather vague formulations of divinatory techniques resemble these “clouds of cognition” that, according to Jung, constitute “absolute knowledge.”

Von Franz further explains that Jung’s “clouds of cognition” represents an awareness on the part of our conscious intelligence of a far vaster field of information, an “absolute knowledge,” within the collective unconscious. These images, on the part of a “more or less conscious ego,” lack precise focus and detail. Thus, the realization of meaning has to be “a living experience that touches the heart just as much as the mind.” She continues:



“Archetypal dream images and the images of the great myths and religions still have about them a little of the “cloudy” nature of absolute knowledge in that they always seem to contain more than we can assimilate consciously, even by means of elaborate interpretations. They always retain an ineffable and mysterious quality that seems to reveal to us more than we can really know.”*

On 9 February 1960, about a year before he died, Jung wrote Mr. A. D. Cornell about the disappointing end to his grand experiment:


“Under certain conditions it is possible to experiment with archetypes, as my ‘astrological experiment’ has shown. As a matter of fact we had begun such experiments at the C. G. Jung Institute in Zurich, using the historically known intuitive, i.e., synchronistic methods (astrology, geomancy, Tarot cards, and the I Ching). But we had too few co-workers and too little means, so we could not go on and had to stop.”

The experiment proposed by Jung is discussed in the Journal of Parapsychology (March 1998): in an article titled: “The Rhine-Jung letters: distinguishing parapsychological from synchronistic events – J.B. Rhine; Carl Jung” by Victor Mansfield, Sally Rhine-Feather, James Hall. The authors conclude:"
https://marygreer.wordpress.com/2008...ung-and-tarot/
 

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