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Spider-Man: No Way Home — No Way to Watch



Gene Steinberg

Forum Super Hero
Staff member
When I first began to read Spider-Man comics in the early 1960s, I couldn't conceive what a financial juggernaut it would become once it became a movie franchise.

The latest film, Spider-Man: No Way Home, released in 2021, grossed $1,915,958,692, making it one of the most popular movies in history. And this came during a pandemic. Amazing.

Rotten Tomatoes ratings were extraordinary for any film: 93% from reviewers and 98% from the audience.

Well the other day, we took advantage of a special offer for Starz streaming, at $1.99 per month for the first three months. That Spider-Man film was part of the package.

Barbara and I had troubles with the previous entry in the series, Spider-Man: Far From Home. The dialogue and situations were jokey in a way that even teens would find juvenile. Performances were OK I suppose, but we gave up after a half hour or so. It was, to us, unwatchable despite its success.

Now I know we're in the minority, but No Way Home was, if possible, worse. It uses the shopworn multiverse schtick to bring back not just villains from previous Spider-Man movies, but two of the previous actors who played the web spinner, Andrew Garfield and, of course, Tobey McGuire.

But we never got that far. After enduring the silly slapstick, silly situations and silly dialogue of the first 40 minutes, we turned it off.

Comic book characters can be used in movies without becoming overdone live-action comic books. There are loads of examples. I just don't get it.
 

Richard Hawkins

Paranormal Maven
When I first began to read Spider-Man comics in the early 1960s, I couldn't conceive what a financial juggernaut it would become once it became a movie franchise.

The latest film, Spider-Man: No Way Home, released in 2021, grossed $1,915,958,692, making it one of the most popular movies in history. And this came during a pandemic. Amazing.

Rotten Tomatoes ratings were extraordinary for any film: 93% from reviewers and 98% from the audience.

Well the other day, we took advantage of a special offer for Starz streaming, at $1.99 per month for the first three months. That Spider-Man film was part of the package.

Barbara and I had troubles with the previous entry in the series, Spider-Man: Far From Home. The dialogue and situations were jokey in a way that even teens would find juvenile. Performances were OK I suppose, but we gave up after a half hour or so. It was, to us, unwatchable despite its success.

Now I know we're in the minority, but No Way Home was, if possible, worse. It uses the shopworn multiverse schtick to bring back not just villains from previous Spider-Man movies, but two of the previous actors who played the web spinner, Andrew Garfield and, of course, Tobey McGuire.

But we never got that far. After enduring the silly slapstick, silly situations and silly dialogue of the first 40 minutes, we turned it off.

Comic book characters can be used in movies without becoming overdone live-action comic books. There are loads of examples. I just don't get it.
no doubt it was the lazy mans way to make a movie.
 

Gene Steinberg

Forum Super Hero
Staff member
Says Wikipedia:

"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" officially holds the record, with a budget of $378.5 million.

How can you spend nearly $400 million on a pirate film? I understand super heroes and elaborate CGI, but certainly Johnny Depp's makeup didn't cost that much. :)
 
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