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From The Black Vault: Strange Denial of a FOIA request re: Luis Elizondo and AATIP


Christopher O'Brien

Back in the Saddle Aginn
Staff member
Article HERE:

by John Greenewald, Jr.
The Black Vault

On December 16, 2017, Tom Delonge’s To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science released two of three UFO videos that are in their “custody” – stating they were officially declassified by the U.S. Government.

It was also announced these videos were part of the secret UFO Research program known as the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program. This existence was based on the testimony of one of the To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science teammbers Luis Elizondo. According to the website:

“Luis Elizondo is a career intelligence officer whose experience includes working with the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, the National Counterintelligence Executive, and the Director of National Intelligence. As a former Special Agent In-Charge, Luis conducted and supervised highly sensitive espionage and terrorism investigations around the world. As an intelligence Case Officer, he ran clandestine source operations throughout Latin America and the Middle East. Most recently, Luis managed the security for certain sensitive portfolios for the US Government as the Director for the National Programs Special Management Staff. For nearly the last decade, Luis also ran a sensitive aerospace threat identification program focusing on unidentified aerial technologies. Luis’ academic background includes Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, with research experience in tropical diseases. Luis is also an inventor who holds several patents.”​

When Mr. Elizondo’s inclusion in this project was announced, and his biography above was published (along with the press conference held by Mr. Delonge) I quickly filed a FOIA request for records pertaining to this, “sensitive aerospace threat identification program” as referenced by the To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science.

At the time of the press conference, and the filing of my FOIA Request, the full name of Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program was not published, but rather, it was only referenced as the, “sensitive aerospace threat identification program” on the website, and the “DOD Aerospace Threat Program” by media outlets such as the Huffington Post. Therefore, in my request, I asked for the following:

“I respectfully request a copy of records, electronic or otherwise, of the following: all documents pertaining to the outline, mission statement, objectives, etc of the DOD Aerospace Threat Program. Please note: this may not be the exact, title, but is derived from the testimony of Mr. Luis Elizondo, former DOD employee. According to the Huffington Post (as published HERE:)
You will notice that to circumvent any word games by the DoD, I stated, “Please note: this may not be the exact, title, but is derived from the testimony of Mr. Luis Elizondo, former DOD employee.” In other words, even though I knew I was probably slightly off on the title, I gave them DOD personnel testimony, a link to what the program obviously was, and there was no way they could plead ignorance that I was “not specific enough.”

On November 27, 2017, the DOD responded with a “no records” determination. (my emphasis)

There are three possibilities:

1) The DoD is lying — which under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) — if proven — is actually more of a damning situation than you might think.

2) The program is being blown out of proportion, is misinformation, or doesn’t even exist.

3) For whatever reason, the DoD doesn’t have an outline, mission statement, objectives, etc of the DOD AviationThreat Program as my specific request asked for, but it does exist. It would be highly doubtful, but a possibility, so my “no records” response is simply directed at my specific request.

So, I have appealed the “no records” response, and have filed more FOIA requests — but something does not seem to add up.

Another FOIA request I filed, which has a final response, as of 8 January 2018, was to the National Security Agency (NSA). In this specific request, I asked for any Intellipedia references to this program (and I termed it: “Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program” and filed a second request with “Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program” since the media reported both names. The CORRECT name, according to the Department of Defense, as confirmed to me over the telephone, is “Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program.” Why the descrepency and misreporting? I do not know).

REST OF ARTICLE HERE:
 

USI Calgary

J. Randall Murphy
Staff member
Article HERE:

by John Greenewald, Jr.
The Black Vault

On December 16, 2017, Tom Delonge’s To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science released two of three UFO videos that are in their “custody” – stating they were officially declassified by the U.S. Government.

It was also announced these videos were part of the secret UFO Research program known as the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program. This existence was based on the testimony of one of the To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science teammbers Luis Elizondo. According to the website:

“Luis Elizondo is a career intelligence officer whose experience includes working with the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, the National Counterintelligence Executive, and the Director of National Intelligence. As a former Special Agent In-Charge, Luis conducted and supervised highly sensitive espionage and terrorism investigations around the world. As an intelligence Case Officer, he ran clandestine source operations throughout Latin America and the Middle East. Most recently, Luis managed the security for certain sensitive portfolios for the US Government as the Director for the National Programs Special Management Staff. For nearly the last decade, Luis also ran a sensitive aerospace threat identification program focusing on unidentified aerial technologies. Luis’ academic background includes Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, with research experience in tropical diseases. Luis is also an inventor who holds several patents.”​

When Mr. Elizondo’s inclusion in this project was announced, and his biography above was published (along with the press conference held by Mr. Delonge) I quickly filed a FOIA request for records pertaining to this, “sensitive aerospace threat identification program” as referenced by the To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science.

At the time of the press conference, and the filing of my FOIA Request, the full name of Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program was not published, but rather, it was only referenced as the, “sensitive aerospace threat identification program” on the website, and the “DOD Aerospace Threat Program” by media outlets such as the Huffington Post. Therefore, in my request, I asked for the following:

“I respectfully request a copy of records, electronic or otherwise, of the following: all documents pertaining to the outline, mission statement, objectives, etc of the DOD Aerospace Threat Program. Please note: this may not be the exact, title, but is derived from the testimony of Mr. Luis Elizondo, former DOD employee. According to the Huffington Post (as published HERE:)
You will notice that to circumvent any word games by the DoD, I stated, “Please note: this may not be the exact, title, but is derived from the testimony of Mr. Luis Elizondo, former DOD employee.” In other words, even though I knew I was probably slightly off on the title, I gave them DOD personnel testimony, a link to what the program obviously was, and there was no way they could plead ignorance that I was “not specific enough.”

On November 27, 2017, the DOD responded with a “no records” determination. (my emphasis)

There are three possibilities:

1) The DoD is lying — which under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) — if proven — is actually more of a damning situation than you might think.

2) The program is being blown out of proportion, is misinformation, or doesn’t even exist.

3) For whatever reason, the DoD doesn’t have an outline, mission statement, objectives, etc of the DOD AviationThreat Program as my specific request asked for, but it does exist. It would be highly doubtful, but a possibility, so my “no records” response is simply directed at my specific request.

So, I have appealed the “no records” response, and have filed more FOIA requests — but something does not seem to add up.

Another FOIA request I filed, which has a final response, as of 8 January 2018, was to the National Security Agency (NSA). In this specific request, I asked for any Intellipedia references to this program (and I termed it: “Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program” and filed a second request with “Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program” since the media reported both names. The CORRECT name, according to the Department of Defense, as confirmed to me over the telephone, is “Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program.” Why the descrepency and misreporting? I do not know).

REST OF ARTICLE HERE:
@Thomas R Morrison pointed out that the FOIA request used the wrong name for the program and that they are sticklers for absolute accuracy. That makes perfect sense to me. Hey did you notice the articles I posted on the MRI studies of brains on LSD? There's some stuff there I think you'd find interesting.
 

Realm

Paranormal Adept
@Thomas R Morrison pointed out that the FOIA request used the wrong name for the program
No, it didn't.

His request was for "The Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program":
http://www.theblackvault.com/casefiles/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/18-F-0324.pdf

That seems to be the correct name. blackvault on reddit:
According to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and their Press Relations officer who I spoke with multiple times, the name was NOT the "Advanced AEROSPACE Threat Identification Program" but rather, it is/was the "Advanced AVIATION Threat Identification Program."
Strange Denial of a FOIA request regarding Luis Elizondo and the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP) • r/UFOs

NYT just got it wrong in their first article.

Edit: Christopher seems to have copied the part about the earlier response above. The later denial that has now been in the news used that correct name.
 

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