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Counting UAPs: The Simple Exerciser of Fusing Data and Gaining Intelligence

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TDSR

Skilled Investigator
#1
Here is an article which I wrote for deepspacepod.com and is where you can find the original post.

Databases such as those housed by MUFON, Bigelow Aerospace, and others contain disparate information. Precedent indicates that these databases will not be integrated any time soon let’s just assume MUFONs data is most accessible. MUFONs information is subjective until corroborated or correlated. Correlating data to other relevant, and even non-initially perceived relevant, data points indicate, if any, a relation exists between the two. A relational model has three key inputs; entities, attributes, and domains. There is script which can “fuse” these inputs into what is known as a “virtual sensor”. For example, if we ask the data for a correlation between events in terms of “date, location, time, and type” as the query criteria we would want to relate the cases which had the same date first, then which cases on that date had a “triangle” shape. When speaking of UAPs we must account for the observations of hyper-acceleration and abnormal speeds and trajectories, therefore it is possible that a craft present on one side of the planet could also account for a craft of the same reported shape seen later on that same day. Time then becomes the discriminator. If we have two triangle craft sightings of the same shape, on the same day, at the same time there is a minimum of two triangle craft in what is commonly called the secret space program, or some other fleet. This is just a simple exercise to demonstrate how data can be fused to provide not only information but also intelligence. I have not yet seen data used to model a relation between “date, location, time, and type”… MUFON, have you?

The Deep Space Resident.....is YOU!
 

USI Calgary

J. Randall Murphy
Staff member
#2
Here is an article which I wrote for deepspacepod.com and is where you can find the original post ... I have not yet seen data used to model a relation between “date, location, time, and type”… MUFON, have you?
Good points.

The example you used also illustrates the value of human intelligence when evaluating the output from database queries. To be more specific, taking into account different time zones so that sightings on about the same day and time can be temporally correlated isn't something a basic database would do without specific human direction, and even if it did, then the filtering process would have to know which factors to take into account and which to leave out in order to reduce the noise level to something meaningful. Practically speaking, only a human can intuit the kinds of relationships between such data effectively enough to assure that relevant data isn't getting left out, or that too much trash is getting in.

It's exactly these kinds of issues that led me to the conclusion that it's unrealistic to expect that some supercomputer with all the raw ufology data in the world would be more useful than a system where humans have already filtered out most of the signal from the noise and added relevant keywords for each entry so that, to use your example, the researcher could simply type something like: 1970,May,20,triangle ufo,00:23:22 GMT and have it return all results where those data points exist, and have already been reviewed and rated.

I created such a system for use with USI, but the problem is getting the data into the system. It requires some dedicated volunteers to comb through cases and tag them accordingly, but as usual, everyone is so busy with their own projects and ideas that they don't have the time or interest in doing the actual work, especially for a project that isn't their baby. Talk and ideas are easy. Making it a reality is another story. Right now the field is a disjointed conglomerate of case reports of varying degrees of reliability without a common filing and retrieval system.
 
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TDSR

Skilled Investigator
#3
Good points.

The example you used also illustrates the value of human intelligence when evaluating the output from database queries. To be more specific, taking into account different time zones so that sightings on about the same day and time can be temporally correlated isn't something a basic database would do without specific human direction, and even if it did, then the filtering process would have to know which factors to take into account and which to leave out in order to reduce the noise level to something meaningful. Practically speaking, only a human can intuit the kinds of relationships between such data effectively enough to assure that relevant data isn't getting left out, or that too much trash is getting in.

It's exactly these kinds of issues that led me to the conclusion that it's unrealistic to expect that some supercomputer with all the raw ufology data in the world would be more useful than a system where humans have already filtered out most of the signal from the noise and added relevant keywords for each entry so that, to use your example, the researcher could simply type something like: 1970,May,20,triangle ufo,00:23:22 GMT and have it return all results where those data points exist, and have already been reviewed and rated.

I created such a system for use with USI, but the problem is getting the data into the system. It requires some dedicated volunteers to comb through cases and tag them accordingly, but as usual, everyone is so busy with their own projects and ideas that they don't have the time or interest in doing the actual work, especially for a project that isn't their baby. Talk and ideas are easy. Making it a reality is another story. Right now the field is a disjointed conglomerate of case reports of varying degrees of reliability without a common filing and retrieval system.
Randall, per usual great context to work from.

Paragraph 1: For antidotal purposes, I would like to share a recent incident involving this very concept. I was in front of a panel of oil executives and leading scientist in applied engineering discussing the state of the possible in remote environmental monitoring. At one point during the presentation, I reinforced that the human analyst was the most fundamental component to the success of the program. I am in violent agreement with you.

Paragraph 2: We can do this!

Paragraph 3: I also ran into the data uptake format issue both in the past and still today. If one is lucky they can copy/save the disparate data sets in the .csv file type. Recently I have been using a data tool known as ontology to cross-reference terms and sectors. Specifically, I was using these databases to see if there was a medical code for any modality or vector associated with the term ufo, radiation, spaceship, extraterrestrial, etc. and did not find anything to report. Here are links to the kinds of databases I was using.....
Search | NCBO BioPortal
(PDF) PEACE: a Plasma Electron and Current Experiment
Military Separation Codes
http://cor.esipfed.org/ont#/st/spacecraft

Happy hunting!

TDSR
 

USI Calgary

J. Randall Murphy
Staff member
#4
Randall, per usual great context to work from.

Paragraph 1: For antidotal purposes, I would like to share a recent incident involving this very concept. I was in front of a panel of oil executives and leading scientist in applied engineering discussing the state of the possible in remote environmental monitoring. At one point during the presentation, I reinforced that the human analyst was the most fundamental component to the success of the program. I am in violent agreement with you.

Paragraph 2: We can do this!

Paragraph 3: I also ran into the data uptake format issue both in the past and still today. If one is lucky they can copy/save the disparate data sets in the .csv file type. Recently I have been using a data tool known as ontology to cross-reference terms and sectors. Specifically, I was using these databases to see if there was a medical code for any modality or vector associated with the term ufo, radiation, spaceship, extraterrestrial, etc. and did not find anything to report. Here are links to the kinds of databases I was using.....
Search | NCBO BioPortal
(PDF) PEACE: a Plasma Electron and Current Experiment
Military Separation Codes
http://cor.esipfed.org/ont#/st/spacecraft

Happy hunting!

TDSR
Thanks for the comments and links. They look like pretty good resources. The Search Feature I came up with would be considered backward and primitive by comparison. But for what it's tailored for, it works fine. It even has advantages.
 
#5
I think Mr Grant Cameron pretty well on the money and if they have knowledge of any type of intelligent life forms from space would they ever tell the World ? No doubt BB was one of many most likely remember there was other nations around the world during that time. So why wouldn't be any different today ?
 

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