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A skull that rewrites the history of man



skunkape

Paranormal Maven
They dug up a pretty old one, considering the location and official history, near my house a few years back. There is evidence of a pyramid building culture in Trinity, TX over 8,000 years old that is mostly ignored for the sake of historical convenience.

Skeletal Remains May Be 11,000 Years Old (Lake Jackson, Texas)
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Schuyler

Misanthrope
The skull is apparently more primitive than Homo Erectus. This skull may not refute anything. You could have multiple migrations of creatures and still maintain the Out of Africa theory, which is based on not just the fossil record, but genetics. I don't think anything needs to be rewritten yet. Still an interesting find.
 

Gareth

Nothin' to see here
Nice. I am massively in favour of an alternate history of this planet (as Im sure many here are). There already seems to be quite a damning collection of evidence.
 

Schuyler

Misanthrope
I don't see how, really. It's just another nail in their coffin. There will probably be folks who jump to the conclusion that this 'blows the Out of Africa theory out of the water,' but I don't see it myself. The new fossils are not really 'out of range' of existing theories. They will certainly provoke a new look at the whole issue given where they were found. I'll just give you one possibility that would accommodate what we know:

The Sahara desert has been called 'The Great Bellows' because in its history it has been both very accommodating to Hominid life, and then very un-accommodating. The idea is that during periods of plenty, when the Sahara is a grasslands, 'people' (very loose term here) migrated into the Sahara. When the desert turned less hospitable, 'people' moved out, including through the Fertile Crescent to the north, into, for example, places like Georgia.

I could see a situation where the pre-Homo erectus guys (The skulls that were found) could have been pumped into Europe, then faded out. The next time the bellows pumped, Homo erectus got through, and the next time the bellows pumped, Homo sapiens did. This idea accommodates the new finds just fine and preserves what (we think we) know already.

Here's an interesting site that shows the idea. Note especially the 'extinction event' in the middle with the eruption of Mt. Toba and the resulting re-trenchment. Also take note of the Ice Ages. It may make you re-consider the so-called 'deleterious effects' of Global Warming. Excuse me: I meant 'Climate Change.'

JOURNEY OF MANKIND - The Peopling of the World

The point is that though these new finds are extremely interesting, they don't really mean a 'total rewrite' of paleontology. It's another piece to the puzzle we didn't have before, and that's great! But we know so much more than we did a hundred years ago, and nothing has really contradicted the basic idea of where we came from. Every new find confirms it.
 

Jose Collado

Skilled Investigator
Everything in evolution is a nail in their coffin. It doesn't stop them. Right now they're probably "manufacturing" facts that disprove the validity of this skull.
 

conor

Skilled Investigator
Okay, lets face it, it is a pretty big big find. what it means is up to the observer and the expert respectively. i personally think is quite significant.
 

Schuyler

Misanthrope
Here's an interesting paper on one of the skulls: Fossil Hominids: Skull D2700 which is actually a discovery almost a decade old now. One wonders why the sudden flurry of publicity. Although this paper has acknowledged a new species: Homo georgicus, there are still many paleontologists who feel these skulls belong to an early form of Homo erectus. Their brain size of up to 750cc is not that much smaller than Homo erectus's 900-1000 ccs. (Homo sapiens averages 1400cc and, interestingly, Neanderthal averages over 1500cc.)

One possibility is that these skulls represent a transition between Homo hablis and Homo erectus, which has never before been found. THAT'S the exciting part of this discovery. More recent bones other than skulls show even more similarity to the modern human form.

After looking into this a bit I am even more convinced that this discovery does NOT represent a 'complete re-writing of human origins.' If anything, it re-confirms what we already know. That there was a migration out of Africa of Homo erectus 'Junior' prior to that of the ancestors of the San Bushmen doesn't negate the fact that we can trace our ancestry back to the Namimbian Bushman tribe using genetics. The 'Out of Africa' theory is quite safe.

The fossil record and genetic research are entirely different lines of inquiry, yet the results from both complement each other nicely. MSM, once again, has no idea what it is talking about when it sensationalizes the issue.

Those interested in the genetic story may like this: The Genographic Project - Human Migration, Population Genetics, Maps, DNA - National Geographic which is an ongoing project where you can participate.
 
P

pixelsmith

Guest
Those interested in the genetic story may like this: The Genographic Project - Human Migration, Population Genetics, Maps, DNA - National Geographic which is an ongoing project where you can participate.
could be fun but... read the fine print, you might find that someone else will actually own your DNA.
 

Schuyler

Misanthrope
could be fun but... read the fine print, you might find that someone else will actually own your DNA.

I have the fine print in front of me. I won't type it all out, but...

We will keep your ... cells only for the Genographic Project. Your cells will not be used for any other purpose without your written permission. The genetic tests we will perform are designed only to research early human origins and movements.

Of course, I quite realize the National Geographic Society could be a front for the New World Order Masonic Illuminati bent on world domination, but I'm cool with that since I'm already a member.
 

Stagger

Herbal Consequentialist
Everything in evolution is a nail in their coffin. It doesn't stop them. Right now they're probably "manufacturing" facts that disprove the validity of this skull.

He/she was simply trying to escape a rainy night in Georgia (hint hint). That's because the weather used to be so much better in the garden.
(of Eden).
 

conor

Skilled Investigator
I have the fine print in front of me. I won't type it all out, but...



Of course, I quite realize the National Geographic Society could be a front for the New World Order Masonic Illuminati bent on world domination, but I'm cool with that since I'm already a member.

Go the One World Order. WoooHooo!;)
 

UBERDOINK

Skilled Investigator
I bet the evolutionists are already "manufacturing" evidence that will marginalize the skull.

"TRUE believers unite! Hold the party line, Reality be damned!"
yelled by a creationist and an evolutionist at the same time, neither heard the other because they were too busy only listening to themselves. :p
 
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