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January 3rd: Terry Hansen

Discussion in 'Talk About the Show' started by Ezechiel, Jan 4, 2010.



  1. Ezechiel

    Ezechiel Paranormal Adept

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    Excellent, intelligent and compelling !

    Mind boggling why any government would want a cover up after listening to the serious tone of this show. In the long run and with enough pressure of this calibre, a Blue Book II has to emerge.

    Why project Blue Book became a priority in the 60's is fascinating stuff.

    In 2010, the fact that there is so little interest in the phenomena and there are no serious initiaves to investigate by governments is really a reflection of the culture of its populations.

    The line between entertainment and life-changing paradigm shifts is totally scrambled by Holywood. :D ... we don't need ufo's we've got Avatar LOL

    Cost of Kepler telescope: $600 million (3.5 years of operation funding included)
    Cost of Avatar movie: $300 million.... sigh !
     

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  3. dusty

    dusty Paranormal Adept

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    Totally with you there Zeek,

    Great interview and after reading the reviews of Mr Hansens book over on Amazon, as well as being recommended reading for UFO rseachers, media students etc, it sounds to me like it should be recommended reading for everyone.
    Real glad you got this guy on chaps, Thanks.

    I wont be getting a new copy though, Gulp :eek:

    Mark
     
  4. Schuyler

    Schuyler Misanthrope

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    Do you mean "Missing Times"? If so, I've got two copies and would send you one. PM me if you want it.
     
  5. mikec

    mikec Paranormal Adept

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    I've always been impressed by the work of Terry Hansen (I even met him once). Insigtful, balanced, skeptical and at the same time - a fine researcher.

    This guy is a good fit for THE PARACAST.

    __________________________

    And - Below is the link to an excellent audio interview with Terry Hansen by Linda Moulton Howe.

    Episode15mp3
     
  6. Decker

    Decker Administrator Staff Member

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  7. midwinter

    midwinter Skilled Investigator

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    Another thoroughly engaging episode. I was hooked throughout.

    I live in the UK and can assure anyone that the issues around censorship are certainly not confined to the US. What I thought was so great about this episode was the clarity in which Terry explained the degree of media manipulation and the role of corporations. I think one of the strengths of The Paracast is how Gene and David make the issues of things like UFOs socially and politically relevant. I come away episode after episode having a great deal to think about. Certainly want to see more episodes of this great quality.

    I'm wondering, though, to what extent these are national issues or whether the cover-up has always been global. It would be interesting to find out whether there was a similar cover-up by the Soviets and Chinese or whether they were just part of one big cover up.
     
  8. Gareth

    Gareth Nothin' to see here

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    Terry seems like a really smart guy. Good show.

    Thanks for your link too Don. I somehow missed that one.
     
  9. CapnG

    CapnG Devil's Advocate

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    See, this is why the Paracast is so damned important and vital: I'd never even heard of Terry Hansen until today. Now he's on my recommended list of go-to guys for those looking to hear some serious thoughts on the UFO subject.

    A top-notch episode that hits all the right notes and an excellent start to 2010!
     
  10. jkoci

    jkoci Watcher of the Skies

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    Just got done listening to the episode. My thoughts exactly. Great discussion.
     
  11. Apocalypto

    Apocalypto Paranormal Adept

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    Hey, awesome show. Thanks!

    Just a couple of comments. In re to "The Day After Roswell‎" - Corso's (and/or Birnes') book - the alien crash itself and all that it entails:

    As far as the book, in and of itself, I'm generally not much of a believer. I've said that before. The thought of Corso stumbling into the exact warehouse where the aliens were being stored, silly. Just silly. Basically, the book sets up way too many synchronistic elements similar to this occurring around Corso.

    Then again, as one reads one definitely gets the impression that Colonel Phillip Corso was, indeed, a very accomplished man. So, is the book just your basic bullshit disinfo digest, containing lots of truth and lots of fiction in a soupy mess?

    Too many silly points were made in the book for me to accept it at face value. Then again, I do believe that something truly wild happened at Roswell, so it's a balancing act.

    Was there an alien spacecraft in Roswell? Quite possibly. Mr. Hansen mentioned in the interview a possible attack by the military on the craft. This is very compelling. It's all speculative, of course, yet entirely possible.

    And as I listened to the program, my mind took it to the next level: Imagine that a meeting had been set up between the military and the aliens, but the military stabbed them in the back, and ambushed them. They never planned on allowing them to land safely. That was never their intention. They just wanted to kill the little bastards and get at their technology, and maybe capture one of them alive, if they could.

    The possibilities are endless, and endlessly fascinating. Something wild and very,very strange did occur at Roswell.

    In re to the oft-mentioned back-engineering of alien spacecraft...

    (Especially to David) Imagine this. Forget the laptop in the time machine...

    Instead, let's say you bring an old analog (CRT) television back 200 hundred years, to 1810, and drop that off at a local scientist's hovel.

    Now, they wouldn't have a clue what the purpose of the thing was (unless, of course, you told them).

    The man (or woman) wouldn't be able to discern how the power supply worked, or how and why the PCB was set up the way it was with parts and bits attached all over the place, wired together, so strange, so organized and... alien...

    How would the glass affect them? They would not have seen glass like that before. Would they not be interested in how it was made? They would (of course) be completely fascinated by certain aspects of the unit, the smooth, perfect glass being one, the linear perfection of the design being another.

    So wouldn't they be able to take that single component and do something with it? Of course they would!

    Another example: The wiring inside. They would be fascinated to see how the plastic was formed over the copper wire. In 1810, an electro-chemical telegraph was constructed in Germany. The electric light was invented right around that time.... also the electric battery... so who knows?

    The transistors and capacitors inside the television would send them for a loop, but they would definitely get lots of ideas about casing and construction by admiring and studying the panels, brackets etc.

    My point is, they would glean some things, and not others. They would gain some new knowledge by studying the television not as a single unit, but as a conglomeration of discrete parts and sections. No doubt they would definitely not be able to grasp the item as a whole, but in parts... well, ya never know how that might help them advance their scientific knowledge.

    And that is how I regard the alien spacecraft in the government's collection. They know what they are looking at (alien spacecraft), but they don't know exactly how to put the whole thing together and make it work, due to limitations in knowledge on power supplies, propulsion issues, special fuels, operational conditions, transmission issues, content, etc. Basically, they're fucking frustrated. :D

    And who wouldn't be?

    Now here's a counter-argument to my own commentary: You've talked on the show about Will Smith flying an alien craft, and how stupid that concept is, and I fully agree. I literally guffawed when I saw it in Independence Day. Now, I'm not so sure. If it's an alien craft, what limitations should we truly be placing on how difficult or hard it would be to operate for a human being? How can we know how a human being would fare in flying a freaky flying saucer? I'll tell you one thing, I'd LOVE TO GIVE IT A SHOT. Seriously.

    And for anyone who has dealt for any length of time with scientists, engineers and test pilots... You know what I'm talking about. It's amazing what some of these guys and gals can do. Limitations start to fade as you sit and listen to some of these geniuses. Interesting stuff, folks.

    Onwards...

    Hey, that holographic computer David mentioned was SO COOL. As an IT pro myself, I thought that was incredible. Years ago I, myself, had a wicked idea. Check this out: A computer fully based and cased in a cubic body of water, using only the matrix of molecules in the water itself to store and pass information back and forth. The water might have to be treated with some sort of saline (or other) solution to allow a certain conductivity, but the point is, it's a biological computer. Think how far this could go once scaled up. Small container size, to bathtub size, pool size, pond, lake... oceans. Now that's a supercomputer!

    The idea isn't without logic, although my capabilities are ZERO to actually go beyond a simple sci-fi-like conceptualization of the idea. If anyone is reading this and creates a computer in a bucket of water, you owe me a beer, okay? :cool: Or maybe you can create a computer out of a bucket of beer, and we can drink it, and get drunk and smarter at the same time? Ah, the Paracast always gets me thinking. ::)

    Yeah, this Mr. Hansen is one smart dude. Loved the episode. Might have to give it another spin on the iriver to get the full trip digested.

    Have a great week, guys! And Happy New Year to the whole Paracast community.
     
  12. kipspritely

    kipspritely Paranormal Adept

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    I 100% agree with Apocalypto. Information would be gleaned and useful (however small).
     
  13. Ezechiel

    Ezechiel Paranormal Adept

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    He was and had a spectacular career... the guy was a war hero and he decided to trash his name and reputation for truth about the crash of an alien spacecraft ?
    Why would anybody taint his life accomplishments with BS ? Would you want your grandkids to get teased at school for BS ?

    Is any amount of money worth this kind of attention ?

    Gordon Cooper falls in the same category as Corso. Unwavering commitment to tell a story as they experienced it, regardless of the consequences.

    Its the ultimate smoking gun... unless some psychiatrist/psychologist can explain this away :D
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Schuyler

    Schuyler Misanthrope

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    Hansen certainly is level-headed. Good show. I do have some issues I will bring up another time.

    On Corso: I've said this before and people usually don't agree with me. So be it, but here it is. Some of you may have had lifetime associations with American military families. Most of you have not. I'm not an 'Army Brat,' but I married one and I have lived in or close to a military community all my life; and I've done some time in and some contract time in the environment. I've held military security clearances, though I was never exposed to anything y'all would consider interesting. Maybe that means something useful, or maybe it just colors my perception.

    Corso was not a 'hero.' He never saw combat. He did not have an 'illustrious career.' He was not highly decorated. Sorry to contradict anyone who thinks so, but it is simply not true. Corso achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel (O-5) before he retired. This is okay and 'respectable' enough, but it is not remarkable and not illustrious. I've had people insist to me that Corso was 'way high up in the military!' No, he wasn't. He was a mid-level officer. A person serving in the officer corps, particularly through two wars, would be expected to achieve bird colonel (O-6) by retirement. That is considered 'normal' in military circles. I believe he may have been awarded that at retirement. This is something you can no longer do. You must be in rank three years to retire at that rank these days.

    You can see how the military values your rank and time in service by looking at a military pay chart. At a certain point, you no longer get raises at a given rank and tenure. That's because you are expected to move up. If you don't, you're peaked out. In the US Navy, you reach "High Year Tenure" and are forced to resign if you don't make rank. In military circles, if you hear of someone who is a retired Lt. Col, you make certain assumptions. Either 'something happened' to prevent his promotion (Either he screwed up or encountered politics), or he could have spent some significant time enlisted before achieving a commission. He could have been a 'Limited Duty Officer' (LDO) where the provisions of the commission limited his rank. Corso was never enlisted. He was not an LDO.

    Reading between the lines, given the length of his service, Corso had to have been considered for full Colonel at at least one point, and probably two, and been passed over for promotion. This is the kiss of death in the military. In the Navy, I once overheard a conversation of a Captain (O-6) who was considering a subordinate he didn't know for a position. The person on the other end of the phone I could not hear, but the Captain said, "Twice passed over Lieutenant Commander? Thank you very much!" and hung up the phone laughing.

    Corso's career was a bit odd for an army officer. He spent most all of his time 'attached' to commands that were not his main field of work. He was not in a 'command track' like Infantry or Artillery where he could amass experience commanding ever-increasing numbers of troops, but in support positions. This may very well have affected his promotional status. He only had one brief command in Europe. In other words, this is not the kind of career that gets you promoted to the General Staff.

    He was also a bit of a megalomaniac. At one point he claimed he, alone, 'saved Italy' from the Communists, and he notoriously over-stated his National Security Council position, which was as a support staff. Of course, we can blame that on 'mis-communication' or on Bill Birnes if we want, but given some of Corso's other statements, this fits right in. He knew what he was saying. These little things mean a lot in the military. I was once given the position of "Assistant to the Director" of a department. People would congratulate me saying, "I hear you are now Assistant Director!' I had to quickly point out (or I would have been dead meat), "No, Assistant TO THE Director." Corso's career was most always in the latter category.

    The next problem with Corso is that the things he says he salted into industry have a very well-documented history of invention. Integrated circuits didn't just 'pop up' as a spectacular new invention. They are the 'next step' in a long line of similar technologies that did essentially exactly the same thing. They are not by themselves something new; they are a new way of doing something we'd been doing ourselves for a hundred years. It's all the same basic plan. It's just that prior to integrated circuits we did exactly the same thing with transistors, with vacuum tubes, with electro-mechanical devices, and with simply mechanical devices, back into the 1800s.

    And I agree completely with Apocalypto that Corso had way too many experiences he just happened upon accidentally to be credible. He just does not pass the sniff test for me.
     
  15. CapnG

    CapnG Devil's Advocate

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    Well stated Schuyler and very informative. I think you passed over one point a little too quickly though, namely Mr. Birnes. If anyone can be directly accredited with "growing the legend" of Corso, it's Bill. Say what you will about him (and I know I've said plenty) but that man can sell.
     
  16. owlman

    owlman Paranormal Adept

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    A thoroughly enjoyable and fascinating interview. An excellent job guys, you asked the right questions and got some very very interesting answers.

    Now..when are you going to get Larry Warren and the whole Rendelsham gang on ?
    That would be mind-blowing.
     
  17. Ezechiel

    Ezechiel Paranormal Adept

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    Thanks for deflating the balloon ! ... after reading a bit more about Corso, it appears you are right.

    On a 0-100 credibility scale how would you rate Corso ? And would Terry Hansen's book suffer if the Corso account turned out to be totally fraudulent ?
     
  18. Gareth

    Gareth Nothin' to see here

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    But... but... but......

    I want it to be true dammit!
     
  19. Schuyler

    Schuyler Misanthrope

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    Sorry. :( I don't think this affects Hansen much. Although he supports Corso in a book ten years old, before some of this stuff came up, his main thesis is about journalism and the press. That's where he concentrates. Corso is only a peripheral part of that. So I don't think this hurts Hansen much at all.
     
  20. Ezechiel

    Ezechiel Paranormal Adept

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    It makes perfect sense. Corso is bunk in my books :(


    Corso is one of 'truths protective layers'.. to paraphrase Neil Armstrong



    What would be his main motive for dishing out crap ?
    • Make money off a goofy book (Government pensions suck) that will pay for his grandkids education ?
    • To divert attention off special govnmt projects or agendas (and getting paid for it lol)
    • To get attention and recognition (megalomaniac)
    • All of the above ;)
    Its like a win/win if you look at it this way. You become a disinformation agent for the government, make money off the ufo community with books, divert attention to a non-event and get your face on tv. Its a megalomaniacs dream ... attention, recognition and money coming in from all sources and everybody is happy LOL... Even a lottery ticket wouldn't get you more satisfaction ;)
     
  21. Gareth

    Gareth Nothin' to see here

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    I honestly couldnt even get through the Corso book. And Im someone who always finishes what I start.

    I just couldnt shake the idea that everything I was reading was total bullshit. I want to at least finish the book one day, so I can form a final opinion.
     

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